Program of Studies - High School

Program of Studies

2016-2017

     

West Springfield High School

425 Piper Road

West Springfield, MA 01089

Phone (413) 263- 3400

Program of Studies

2016-2017

Table of Contents

 

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Student Course Selection Timeline and Deadlines

Wednesday February 10, 2016

Program of Studies Distribution and Teacher Recommendation Day

The Program of Studies will be distributed to students Chromebooks

Students will receive a copy of the course selection form in their first block class

Students will meet with all of their classes to review course requests and receive recommendations from teachers

Teachers must complete course recommendations for all of their classes before this day in PowerSchool

Friday February 12, 2016

Open Enrollment Begins (Grades 9-11)

Students will be able to submit their course requests via PowerSchool Portal.

More details will be available for students and parents about this process as well as the process for students in Grade 8

Monday February 22, 2016

Course Selection Meeting

Students will begin to have individual/group meetings with guidance counselors to review course requests and individual student needs.

Counselors will send meeting notices to students

Tuesday March 22, 2016

Course Conflict Form Deadline

Student Internship Deadline

Early Release Form Deadline

Thursday August 18, 2016

Terrier House Orientation (this date is subject to change)

Grade 9 and students new to the West Springfield High School

Friday August 19, 2016

Schedule Distribution

Grade 9 students will receive their schedules at the Terrier House Orientation on Thursday August 18, 2016

All other schedules, including students who were not in attendance at the orientation, will be mailed home the next day

Tenth Day of School or Friday after Open House

(whichever date is later)

No Penalty Add/Drop Period Ends

The exception to this policy is that students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses may not be considered for withdrawal from an AP class until October 1st.  

FOREWORD TO STUDENTS AND PARENTS/GUARDIANS

WEST SPRINGFIELD HIGH SCHOOL

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We have prepared this Program of Studies to make students and parents/guardians aware of the courses available and the basic principles that govern our school. Students and parents/guardians together are responsible for planning the best course sequence, but please know that teachers, guidance counselors, and administrators are available to assist students and their families with the selection process.

PLEASE READ:

The material is important to completion of a student's high school academic career at West Springfield High School. Collaboration between families and school is an integral part of the success of a student.

It is essential that students select subjects for next year that will meet their needs and in which they will be successful. If their plan is to enter college or the business world, there are certain subjects, which should be taken. Consult with counselors and teachers for assistance in making choices. After the schedule has been run, changes can be made ONLY UNDER UNUSUAL CIRCUMSTANCES. After 10 school days, coursesbecome a permanent part of the student's record.

Schedules will be sent home during the summer. If any issue exists with the schedule, (i.e., if there is a conflict or a course missing,) students must make an appointment with their guidance counselor to resolve the problem beforethe start of the school year. Counselors’ summer schedules and information will be included with the final report card and will be printed in the West Springfield Record and on the school website.

Schedule changes are not permitted after the no penalty add/drop period. It is the responsibility of the student to address course choices with his/her guidance counselor before summer vacation, and/or to make an appointment during the summer to address any issues that may have arisen relative to the student’s schedule. STUDENTS AND PARENTS/GUARDIANS SHOULD THINK VERY CAREFULLY ABOUT WHAT COURSE EXPECTATIONS WILL BE PRIOR TO SELECTING ANY COURSE. STUDENTS WILL BE EXPECTED TO DEVOTE CONSIDERABLE TIME TO EACH CLASS TAKEN IN ORDER TO BE SUCCESSFUL.

Students and families should consult the Student Handbook online for any policies or procedures not explicitly covered in this document. Furthermore, while every attempt is made to ensure consistency between and among all school publications, the student handbook controls where discrepancies may occur.

STUDENT PERFORMANCE EXPECTATIONS

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The level descriptors below represent an attempt to match the student's needs, interest, and performance level with course expectations. All courses provide the opportunity for challenge, intellectual stimulation, and developmental progress. Teachers, counselors, and administrators are available to recommend a specific instructional placement. Note: The level of courses for students new to West Springfield High School will be determined by an analysis of official records (transcripts) submitted as part of the enrollment process. Courses are identified by level with an icon:

     College Prep,       Honors,       Advanced Placement

Advanced Placement

Advanced Placement courses offer intensive and rigorous college-level instruction whose content has been determined by national standards prescribed by the College Board.  Students must make a strong commitment in terms of time spent on an Advanced Placement course because these courses go into greater depth than any other high school course.  Students must accept responsibility for independent, outside preparations, including homework and long-term projects. Since the course curricula are very extensive and the exams are given in May, some Advanced Placement courses require students to complete summer reading and writing assignments.  Students who are successful on the Advanced Placement Examination may be awarded college credit or advanced standing by the college they attend.  Classes will be scheduled based on course requests and teacher availability.  If a course is not scheduled for one or both reasons, students are encouraged to discuss other options with their guidance counselor.  In order to earn AP weight and carry the AP course distinction on your transcript, students must sign up and pay for the Advanced Placement Examination(s) by March 1st   for the May exam administration.  The cost of the exam is the responsibility of the student and must be paid in full prior to the exam administration.  Exam fees are determined by the College Board at the beginning of each school year. Reduced fees are available to students receiving free and reduced lunch. (See your guidance counselor for more details.)  The Advanced Placement exam satisfies Final Exam requirements for that course.

Honors

Requirements for placement in Honors courses can be found in the course description.

Students must accept responsibility for independent, outside preparations including homework and long-term projects.

Students must demonstrate organizational and time management skills because of the depth and pace of the course.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

It is the responsibility of each student to see that he or she fulfills all the requirements for graduation.

One hundred and ten credits (110) will be required for graduation.

All students must carry a full seven period schedule unless it is otherwise recommended by a physician, a SpecialEducation or Section 504 Team. Any exceptions must be approved by the principal or his/her designee.

Semester courses are 2.5 credits/Full year courses are 5 credits.

Diplomas will only be awarded to students who meet all local graduation and

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MCAS requirements.

A student must:

Earn a minimum of 110 Credits

Pass English 9, 10, 11 and the equivalent of one full year of English 12

Pass four years of Math which must include Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II or its Math equivalent

Pass three years of a lab-based Science which can include the equivalent of a Technology lab (Robotics)

Pass fifteen (15) credits of social studies including the equivalent of 2 US History courses

Pass four courses of PE/Health

Pass the equivalency of one full year course in Fine or Applied Art

Pass additional course credits from any area including content subject to total 110 credits

*Students entering grade 9 having completed any course(s) at the high school will have the course entered on their transcript after they are officially enrolled at the high school. All course(s) will count toward graduation requirements.

Promotion

Grade 9 students must successfully complete their English and Math courses to be promoted to Grade 10

IMPORTANT: Students who have not passed required MCAS tests will be enrolled in MCAS preparation courses.

Credit Recovery

Students have many opportunities to recover the lost credits that they need for promotion and graduation. On an individual basis, students may be allowed to participate in summer school or other programs that will allow them to continue on their path to graduate in four years. The high school has designed a course called Natural Connections to assist in the recovery of credits. This course will be assigned to students during the school day.

Credit Recovery Courses

Credit Recovery – English 9, 10, or 11 (CRE100, CRE101, CRE102); Algebra 1

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(CRM600), Geometry (CRM601), Physical Science (CRS501), Biology (CRS500), Modern World History (CRH200), US History I (CRS201), US History II (CRS202)

Semester course

This class is specifically designed for students who are in their third or fourth year of high school and plan on graduating with their class. Students will have an opportunity to regain credit in specific content areas. Course of study will be based on the student’s academic need and course requests. This course will involve experiential learning revolving around the “natural connections” which is aimed at meeting the needs of nontraditional learners. New and traditional technologies will be incorporated throughout the duration of this course. This semester course will provide 5 credits based upon student achievement.

Suggested Program For Admission To A Four-Year College Or University

As entrance requirements may vary at different colleges and universities, it behooves the student to study admission requirements closely and plan his/her schedule accordingly. Guidance counselors will help students discover specific requirements for any college he/she may choose.

Massachusetts State Colleges And University's Minimum Admissions Standards

http://www.mass.edu/shared/documents/admissions/admissionsstandards.pdf

Admission standards for Massachusetts State Universities, including UMASS are subject to change. The student and his/her parents/guardians should learn about the requirements and start now to take the classes he/she may need to be accepted into college.

Required Courses

To be considered for acceptance to a Massachusetts State University, students need to take the following 16 courses in high school. A course is equal to one full school year of study.

English

4 courses

Mathematics

4 courses (Algebra I & II, Geometry, Trigonometry, or comparable course which MUST be taken during student’s senior year

Sciences

3 courses (including 2 with laboratory work)

Social Studies

2 courses (including 1 in U.S. History)

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Foreign Language 

2 courses (in the same language)

Electives

2 courses (from above subjects or from Arts & Humanities or Computer Science

Required Grades

Students need to do well in their college preparatory courses. Admission standards at State Universities continue to rise, please plan accordingly.

Test Scores

If a student's grades are lower than required, he/she may be able to make up for them by achieving high scores on the SAT or ACT tests. This is a question that can be answered many ways. Students should see their guidance counselor about required test scores for certain colleges/universities. Students who earn the required grades should know that it is important to still take the SAT or ACT tests and have scores sent to the college/universitythat will be applied to. There are no minimum scores you need to earn.  

Exceptions

Students who do not meet these requirements still should apply. Certain State Universities may admit some students based on factors other than those outlined here.

Dual Enrollment/Early College

Students at West Springfield High School may elect to enroll at a local college or university through a Dual Enrollment (DUA) Program. To be eligible for such a program, a student must be in good academic standing at WSHS and have been accepted by the college/university of his/her choice for the upcoming or current semester or year. In addition, students must complete the appropriate (full day or per class) Dual Enrollment Contract with their guidance counselor. A DUA course Approval Form must be completed and signed by all necessary parties prior to the student's’ enrollment in any DUA course. Copies of the contracts and approval form can be found in the WSHS Guidance Office. Students wishing to take one class per semester in the dual enrollment program should be advised that the class they enroll in will not be counted in their overall grade point average. Students who enroll in more than one class per semester in the dual enrollment program will be excluded entirely from class rank. Please note, it is the students responsibility to check with their college of choice the Dual Enrollment/Early College credits will transfer.

NCAA Requirements

NCAA Division I & II Initial Eligibility Requirements (Please Note: Students and

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their families in conjunction with their school counselor should begin this process the student's Junior year. Requirements are subject to change)

Core Courses

16 core courses are required. (see charts below)

Test Scores (ACT/SAT)

DI requires students to present a corresponding test score & core-course GPA on sliding scale.

DII requires minimum 820 on SAT or sum score of 68 on ACT.

Core Grade-Point Average

Only core courses that appear on the high’s school List of NCAA Courses on the NCAA Eligibility Center’s website (www.eligibilitycenter.org) will be used to calculate your core-course GPA.

Division I Core Course Requirements (16)Division II Core Course Requirements (16)

4 years of English

3 years of math (Algebra I or higher)

2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered)

1 year of additional English, math or natural/physical science

2 years of social science

4 years of additional courses (any area above, foreign language or comparative religion/philosophy)

3 years of English

2 years of math (Algebra I or higher)

2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered)

3 year of additional English, math or natural/physical science

2 years of social science

4 years of additional courses (any area above, foreign language or comparative religion/philosophy)

GPA

Report cards reflect weighted cumulative grade point averages (GPA).  College Prep, Honors and Advanced Placement grades affect GPA calculation differently because they are assigned varying weighted values with AP weighted the highest.  All coursework on a student's transcript is calculated in the GPA, except for the following:

Physical education courses

Classes taken on a pass/fail or audit basis

Withdraw pass (WP) and fail (WF) courses

All summer school courses

Any courses not approved by the school and taken offsite (early college, dual enrollment, online, evening school)

How to calculate GPA

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1. Points per eligible course: Multiply the course grade GPA value by the number of course credits

2. Total points earned: Sum the total of points from all eligible courses

3. Total credits attempted: Sum the cumulative credits attempted

4. Calculate the GPA: Divide total points earned by the total credits attempted

Pathways To Prosperity

Pathways To Prosperity is a grant funded program that combines academics with manufacturing technology job preparation.  Students enroll in a six-year pathway that leads them from West Springfield High school to Springfield Technical Community College. Students take a directed course pathway that prepares them for the college classes in manufacturing technology.  While enrolled, students can take advantage of the benefit of free college classes, at STCC, through dual enrollment, which will strengthen their academic foundation and better prepare them for their college studies. All P2P students must meet the math and English proficiency requirements for entrance into STCC Manufacturing Tech program in order to remain as an active participant in this program.   P2P students have the unique opportunity to meet business sponsors and cultivate potential employer relationships while they attend class.  Field trips and on-site visits provide students with an exposure to the workplace and the required job skills.  Students can qualify for summer work experiences and all students receive employment preparation training which includes resume writing, job interview counseling and work performance assessment training.  The high school-to-college focus in this program not only prepares students to graduate from STCC,  it prepares them to enter the highly competitive workforce of manufacturing technology, armed with the essential skills they need to be exemplary in their work.

Early Release

Early Release is available to students who are either a senior in good standing or have special circumstances, which require it.  Prior to applying for Early Release, student athletes should consider MIAA rules for maintaining course credits in order to be eligible to participate in athletics at the school.   In order to be considered for Early Release, students must:

Have completed 90 credits at the end of their Junior Year

Have no outstanding financial obligations at time of registration

Have completed the appropriate Early Release form by the registration deadline (forms are available in the guidance office)

Have achieved a qualifying score (i.e. 220) in all MCAS testing areas

Be approved by the principal or his/her designee.

Course Prerequisites

When making course selections, please check for any prerequisites that may exist. Prerequisites are listed in bold type before the course description.

Whether a student meets the prerequisite will be determined initially by their grade/performance at midyear. For example, the prerequisite for French II is successful completion of French I. If he/she has a midterm average of at least a 60  

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in French I, that student will be allowed to select French II.

Although students and their families have the right to select their course schedules the recommendation of a faculty member should be a consideration when making such selections. If a student decides to select a course for which they are not recommended, they must see their Guidance Counselor to determine if enrollment in the desired course is possible. If it is decided that enrollment in the course is appropriate, he/she will be provided with a course conflict form to indicate that the student, his/her parent/guardian and recommending faculty member are not in agreement. Conflict forms have a deadline. The student will not be scheduled in the desired course unless the conflict form is submitted to the guidance department.  

No Penalty Add/Drop Period

In order to affect schedule changes without penalty, all schedule changes must be resolved no later than the tenth day of school or the Friday following Open House, whichever is later.

Schedule changes for Semester 2 only courses must be resolved no later than the tenth day of school during that semester.

After the no penalty add/drop period ends, any withdrawal will be recorded as a Withdraw Pass (WP) or Withdraw Fail (WF) on the transcript.  Grades of WP or WF are not calculated in the GPA.  Unless there are extenuating/special circumstances, any student entering a class after the first 10 days of class will be graded as an Audit (AU) for that semester.   

Grade Policy Regarding Class Level Changes – If a student is allowed a class level change, after the 10 day no penalty add/drop period, teachers will factor in grades earned by students who change course levels in a specific subject area.

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English Language Arts Pathways

     

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ENGLISH

Four full years of English are required for graduation. Each year, all students will:

Receive grade level instruction in writing, grammar, usage, mechanics, and vocabulary.

Read full-length and anthologized literature, following each course’s curriculum.

Receive language, media, and literature strands from the 2011 Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the Common Core State Standards.

In addition:

All College Preparatory, Honors, and Advanced Placement students in grades 9-12 will write, for each course, research-based essays in preparation for college writing.

All freshmen and sophomores will receive preparation for the ELA MCAS.

All students currently enrolled in honors or Advanced Placement at WSHS are required to complete a summer reading project and the assessment of the project upon their return to school

The assignments will be distributed and explained to all students (grades 8-11), before school is dismissed in June.  The assignments will be posted on the high school bulletin boards, West Springfield Public Library, West Springfield High School and Middle School offices, and posted atwsps.org.

Freshmen and Sophomores

Core Courses

     English 9C: College Preparatory English (ENG015/THS015)

Full-year Course

English 9C is designed for all College Preparatory students, and focuses on: (1) writing, grammar, usage, mechanics, and vocabulary; and (2) reading classical and modern world literature.  All students will write original and research-based essays on imaginative and nonfiction literature.  The major works studied will be Homer's The Odyssey, of Mice and Men, and Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

     English 9H: Honors/Pre-AP English (THS017)

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Full-year Course

English 9H is a Pre-AP course of study, leading directly to placement in English 10 H, and then to junior and senior Advanced Placement English. Students who enter English 9H will write original and research based essays for varied purposes and audiences. They will read classic ancient and modern literature, and conduct close analysis of The Odyssey, Of Mice and MenandRomeo and Juliet.  For this course, students will learn advanced skills for: (1) writing critical essays on literature; and (2) read literature in the form of fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry. Students will learn to identify, apply and analyze knowledge of various forms of literature and literary devices.

     English 10C: College Preparatory English (ENG025)  

Full-year Course  

English 10Cbuilds upon the studies begun in grade 9.  Students will explore modes of writing and acquire skills necessary to succeed on the ELA MCAS.   Students who enter English 10C will write analytical and research-based essays for varied purposes and audiences. They will take part in analysis of poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction, including such works as Julius Caesar, and  To Kill A Mockingbird.  

     English 10H: Honors/Pre-AP English (ENG027)

Full-year Course

English 10H is a Pre-AP course of study, leading directly to placement in junior-year AP English Language and Composition, or English 11 Honors.  Students who enter English 10H will write analytical and research-based essays for varied purposes and audiences. They will take part in advanced analysis of poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction, including such major works as Julius Caesar, andTo Kill A Mockingbird.

Junior

Core Courses

     English 11C: College Preparatory English (ENG030)

Full-year Course

English 11 College embraces the 11th grade Common Core Standards. The course is premised upon the study of American Literature. Students will have opportunity to expand and polish reading, writing, research, technology, listening, viewing, and

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speaking skills while studying a variety of genres. Active reading strategies, process writing, and higher order/critical thinking skills will be utilized to analyze and interpret reading selections from specific time periods: Colonial, Rationalist, Romantic, Transcendentalist, Realist, and Modernist. Students will demonstrate proficiency of the writing process through narrative, reflective, descriptive, persuasive literary analysis, and research writing.   

     English 11H: Honors English (ENG038)

Full-year Course  

English 11 Honors embraces the 11th grade Common Core Standards. The course is premised upon the study of American Literature. Students will have opportunity to expand and polish reading, writing, research, technology, listening, viewing, and speaking skills while studying a variety of genres at an advanced level, which includes rigorous independent reading and enrichment based learning. Critical thinking skills will be used to analyze and interpret reading selections from specific time periods: Colonial, Rationalist, Romantic, Transcendentalist, Realist, and Modernist. Students will demonstrate proficiency of the writing process through narrative, reflective, descriptive, persuasive literary analysis, and research writing.   

     Advanced Placement English Language and Composition (ENG098)

Full-year Course

This course trains students to become skilled readers of nonfiction prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts; and trains them to become skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes.  Both their reading and writing will make students more aware of the interactions among writers’ purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.  Students completing this course will be prepared for placement in senior-year Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition.  *See AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.

Senior

Core Courses

Beginning with senior year, students must complete a minimum of two semesters of English. They may choose from among:

One full year AP English course

Two half-year Core Courses *

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*The asterisk represents available semester courses for Senior year only.

     Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition (ENG099)

Full-year Course

This course will engage students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature.  Through close reading, students will deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers.  Students will learn to consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as the elements of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone. Through careful reading, discussion, and writing, students will become more skillful at interpreting literature.  *See AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.

     *British Literature (ENG035)

Semester Course

This course is a survey of British literature from its origins to the present.  The readings will focus on the major British literary eras: Old English, Middle English, Modern English, and Postmodern English. Students will read one Shakespeare play, and writing will concentrate on research-based critical essays.  Additionally, students will continue to develop skills in grammar, usage, mechanics, and vocabulary - all necessary for success on the PSAT and SAT.  There will be an in-depth study of at least one full-length work of British literature.

     *Philosophy and Literature East and West (ENG816)

Semester Course

This course serves two purposes: (1) as an introduction to the definition, branches, principles and practice of Philosophy; and (2) as a survey of ancient and modern literary texts from the East and West that address the major philosophical questions.  The central theme of the course is the problem of evil, and how humans have explained it; many shorter works of fiction and poetry from the East and the West will be read to explore that theme.   The course format will be discussion of reading, writing short papers, and ending in the completion of a philosophically based research paper.

     *Postmodern Literature (ENG032)

Semester Course

This course will expose students to literature written between the 1950’s to the present, with a focus on postmodern literature and life after World War II.  The primary focus of the course is the conflict between the individual and society.  The course will also explore  

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the role played by culture (national, ethnic, religious, and political) in forming individual perspectives.  Students will read novels and short stories and excerpts from graphic novels.

     *Shakespeare (ENG081)

Semester Course

This course is designed to explore Shakespeare’s plays in greater number and depth than is possible within the scope of a traditional English course.  Students will read, discuss, view videos, research, rewrite, direct, and perform scenes from Shakespeare’s plays, both in groups and individually.  There will also be opportunities to read and discuss selections of Shakespeare’s narrative poetry.  Students will be encouraged to apply their knowledge of history, of  language, and of their writing, research, and oral skills to classic Shakespearean literature.

     *Women & Literature (ENG075)

Semester Course  

This course will survey representative works written by and about women from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries as well as introduce students to the major issues faced by the female writer in her struggle to gain authorship.  This course is meant to expose students to literature not included in a traditional English course.  Texts will explore the historical and cultural influences on women’s literature.  Students will be expected to complete a research project at the end of the course.  Students will be exposed to literature written by and about women and will identify and analyze issues significant to the development of women’s literature.

Elective Courses

     Creative Writing (ENG066)

Semester Course

In this course, students will read and write poems, short stories and dramatic scenes, a journal, and produce a classroom portfolio.  The Creative Writing student will experiment with basic poetic forms and learn the fundamental elements of short fiction and short drama.They will practice imaginative writing and conduct both group and individual presentations.

     Journalism I, II, and III (I-ENG054, II-ENG055, III-ENG058)

Full-year Course*

Prerequisite: Recommendation from English teacher & writing sample

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submitted to the Journalism teacher

The school newspaper, The Terrier Times, will be produced by members of the Journalism class.  Staff positions are assigned based upon a student's demonstrated capability in a particular area.  In addition to writing newspaper articles, students will receive reading assignments based upon principles and techniques of effective interviewing, news, editorial, feature, and sports writing.  In Journalism I, students will develop a basic understanding of what’s news and how to write and present it effectively. In Journalism II, students will be expected to not only further hone these skills but also to learn how to edit both copy and layout, and to mentor less experienced writers. The course is open to Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors who are serious about producing a quality newspaper for our school.

     Freshman Foundations in English (THS020)

Semester Course

This one-semester course is designed as a proactive intervention to help prepare 9th grade students who are at risk for not being successful with typical high school English curriculum and/or achieving proficiency on the MCAS test.  It is focused on developing essential skills needed to succeed within English Language Arts classes at the high school and when taking the MCAS exam.  Students will engage in curriculum and participate in assignments designed to support background knowledge and make progress in this discipline, especiallywhen articulating ideas into writing.  Students will be hand-selected for this course using the student’s ELA MCAS results and teacher recommendation.

     Sophomore Foundations in English (ENG058)

Semester Course  

This is a one-semester course designed to help second year students continue developing essential curricular skills in English Language Arts as well as test-taking strategies needed to succeed when taking the ELA MCAS exam. Students will work on skill development, reading and decoding questions, preparing responses, writing prompts, and using other essential test taking strategies to maximize their potential. Students will be hand-selected for this course using data from their 9th grade English course(s).

     English Skills – MCAS Prep (ENG056, ENG057)

Semester Course 

This course is designed to meet the specific needs of students who have not yet met the minimum requirement for a Competency Determination in the ELA MCAS.  Students will practice utilizing previous MCAS examination questions and develop their broad skills in reading, writing, and vocabulary.  This class will also assist seniors who are

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required to submit a portfolio appeal to the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.   

     Freshman Seminar(THS700)

Semester course  

This class is designed to assist first year high school students with learning skills, time-management and career planning skills that will assist them in achieving success in their work. Integrated into the curriculum is the guidance Mass Model. Lessons will center on academic and career goal-setting strategies.  Students will explore their learning styles, their future ambitions and their strengths through computer programs and an established curriculum that allows them to explore their talents and figure out how to tie those talents to their future.   

     Language Skills I (THS010) and Language Skills II (THS011)

Prerequisite:  8th grade teacher recommendation  

Semester Course 

This course is designed for Terrier House Freshman in order to build English skills for students as well as reinforce and supplement the core academic curriculum.  Students will learn effective communication strategies that encompass the oral and written venues as well as developmental strategies that will assist them with organization, study skills, MCAS test taking and project management.     

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Math Pathways

     Note: -To be considered for acceptance to a Massachusetts State University, students need to take a math course every year in high school.

-Students must complete at least one course beyond Algebra II (Advanced Math Topics, Statistics C/AP, or Pre-Calculus C/AP are viable options in the WSHS Program of Studies).

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MATHEMATICS

The minimum graduation requirements for Mathematics are:

Pass four years of Math of which must include Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II or its Math equivalent

     Algebra IA (MAT205/THS210)

Full-year Course

This course is required for all ninth grade students who have not already successfully completed a common core driven Pre-Algebra course or its equivalent. This course is designed for students to master the beginning Algebra concepts, including a review of properties and arithmetic of real numbers, statistical measures, probability and graphical representations of data. Students will complete an in depth study of single and systems of linear equations including solving, graphing and writing linear equations through written, numerical/tabular, graphical, and algebraic methods. Geometry topics that appear in the Massachusetts tenth grade frameworks including perimeter, area, and volume, transformations and translations, similarity, congruence, and midpoint formula will also be reviewed in the context of the Algebra problem solving.

     Algebra IB (MAT215/THS215/Honors THS216)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of a common core Pre-Algebra course or Algebra 1A or its equivalent

Full-year Course

This course is required for all students who have not already completed their Algebra I studies before coming to the high school. The course is designed to quickly review linear functions and solve linear inequalities, systems, and absolute-value equations/inequalities; evaluate and simplify expressions with powers and roots; simplify and perform operations with polynomials; solve quadratic equations; and graph quadratic and exponential functions. Students will continue to review and learn fundamental Massachusetts tenth grade geometry and statistics frameworks including right triangles, the distance formula, parallel lines and transversals, perimeter, area, and volume, and continued review of statistics in the context of the Algebra problem solving.

     Freshman Foundations in Mathematics (THS220)

Semester Course

This one-semester course is designed as a proactive intervention to help prepare 9th grade students who are at risk for not being successful with typical high school Algebra

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curriculum and/or achieving proficiency on the MCAS test.  It is focused on developing essential skills needed to succeed within Mathematics classes at the high school and when taking the MCAS exam.  Students will engage in curriculum and participate in assignments designed to support background knowledge and make progress in this discipline, especially the leap from concrete to abstraction required of Algebra.  Students will be hand-selected for this course using the student’s MATH MCAS results and teacher recommendation.

     Sophomore Foundations in Mathematics (MAT280)

Semester Course

This is a one-semester course designed to help second year students continue developing essential curricular skills in Mathematics as well as test-taking strategies needed to succeed when taking the MATH MCAS exam. Students will work on skill development, reading and decoding questions, problem-solving, preparing open responses, and using other essential test taking strategies to maximize their potential. Students will be hand-selected for this course using data from their 9th grade Math course(s).

     Geometry (MAT233)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in Algebra I

Full-year Course

This class, intended for tenth graders, covers geometry emphasizing two-dimensional Euclidean geometry plus some three-dimensional works. Topics include properties of polygons and circles, parallelism, congruence, similarity, special triangles and right triangle trigonometry, basic proofs, transformations, constructions, calculated measurements, and coordinate geometry. If time allows, more complex proofs will be attempted. Because of the nature of the course materials, state curriculum frameworks and testing, it is essential that this course be taught with a large algebra influence. Therefore successful completion of Algebra 1 before taking this course is best.

     Geometry Honors (MAT237/THS237)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I and/or Algebra II in addition to teacher recommendation. As this is a

Pre-AP course, a student must have STRONG academic initiative.

Full-year Course

This course covers all the topics in geometry. Honors geometry also covers in-depth

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proofs, solid geometry, coordinate geometry, locus of points, transformations and vectors. Term projects may be expected.

     Mathematics Can Achieve Success – MCAS I (MAT270)

Semester Course

A course focusing on algebra and geometry topics covered by the State MCAS tests, including basic mathematical skills, test-taking strategies and problem solving for different types of questions. Daily homework and a daily on-task grade are core components of this course. Intended for juniors and seniors who need to improve their MCAS score.

     Mathematics Can Achieve Success – MCAS II (MAT271)

Semester Course

A course focusing on solving the type of advanced and multi-part problems commonly given on MCAS tests. The course will begin with a review of basic topics and vocabulary covered in MCAS Part 1. Intended for juniors and seniors who need to improve their MCAS score.

     Business Math (MAT212)

Full-year Course

This course provides the opportunity to use basic math skills to solve practical business and personal finance problems. Topics include checking accounts, methods of receiving income, payroll, taxes, fringe benefits, borrowing money, consumer purchases, insurance, buying or leasing a car, maintaining a car, and investments. This course is intended for juniors and seniors who have completed minimum algebra and geometry graduation requirements but have not yet completed Algebra II.

     Problem Solving (MAT211)

Full-year course

Recognizing the importance of problem solving in real life, Henry Ford said “Most people spend more time and energy going around problems than in trying to solve them.” This non-traditional math course investigates a variety of strategies that will help participants solve puzzles. Students will work individually and in teams to develop detailed solutions and will present in both oral and written formats. This course is intended for juniors and seniors who have completed minimum algebra and geometry graduation requirements but have not yet completed Algebra 2.

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     Applied Topics In Algebra II (MAT224)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry

Full Year Course

This Applied Algebra II course is designed to enhance students knowledge of algebra topics and make connections between algebra, geometry, and statistics as we solve problems in a series of realistic situations, or investigations, from which the crucial need for mathematics arise. As a second year of Algebra, this course emphasizes, through numerical, algebraic, and graphical methods, important concepts required by four year colleges including problem solving and mathematical modeling with linear functions and systems, quadratic and variation functions, exponential, logarithmic and financial models, and probability and systems, quadratic and variation functions, exponential, logarithmic and financial models, and probability and statistic. This course is not designed to be complete preparation for PreCalculus.

     Algebra II (MAT223)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry

Full-year Course

This second year algebra course emphasizes, through numerical, algebraic, and graphical methods, important concepts required by more advanced courses such as college PreCalculus and Calculus: a review of linear functions, in-depth study of graphs, behaviors, operations and applications of quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic expressions and/or functions; numerical expressions and equations with powers and; patterns, systems and decision making through mathematical modeling.

     Algebra II Honors (MAT227)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry (preferably honors) in addition to teacher

recommendation. As this is a Pre-A.P. course, a student must have STRONG academic initiative and STRONG

background in mathematics

Full-year Course

In addition to all topics in Algebra II, Honors Algebra II also covers arithmetic and geometric sequences, other functions including square root and absolute value, complex numbers and solving quadratic, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and radical inequalities. Term projects may also be expected.

     Advanced Topics in Mathematics (MAT230)

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Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II

Full-year Course

A course designed to introduce students to more advanced math concepts and shore up skills required by four year colleges, including a review and extension of those studied in Algebra 2, basic trigonometry (e.g., sine/cosine function, right triangle trig, and laws of sines/cosines), sequences and series including binomial expansion, intermediate probability and combinatorics, and conic sections. The purpose of this course is to strengthen a student’s algebraic problem solving skills to help them prepare and transition into Pre-Calculus either at the high school or college level.

     Probability and Statistics (MAT245)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrently enrolled in Algebra II

Full-year Course

This is a course designed to apply data analysis and inferential techniques to real world information. Covers topics in a typical beginning college statistics course including sampling techniques; graphs; measures of central tendency and dispersion; probability and the Binomial, Poisson, Geometric, and Normal distributions; confidence intervals and hypothesis tests; and regression analysis.

     Advanced Placement Statistics (MAT253)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II

Full-year Course

This course follows the CollegeBoard® standards for Advanced Placement Statistics. Topics include those of first-level collegeProbability and Statistics courses. The purpose of this statistics course is to introduce students to themajor concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students areexposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring data through describing patterns and departuresfrom patterns, Sampling and Experimentation involved in planning and conducting a study. Anticipating Patterns through exploration of random phenomena using probability and simulationand Statistical Inference including estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. Thefocus and pace of the course will be in preparation for taking the Advanced Placement exam in May. College creditmay be earned for passing this exam. *See AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.

     Pre-Calculus (MAT251)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II and Geometry

Full-year Course

Emphasis is placed on the following topics: Polynomial, rational, absolute value, radical,  

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step, exponential, logarithmic, periodic, piecewise, and inverse functions. Also studied are principal trigonometric concepts which include angles and their trigonometric functions, trigonometry of triangles, and identities. This course also studies concepts of limits, extrema, and function behavior as a preparation of Calculus. Students planning to take Advanced Placement Calculus should consider an Honors Pre-Calculus.

     Pre-Calculus Honors (MAT257)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II (preferably honors) in addition to teacher recommendation. As this is

a Pre-A.P. course, a student must have STRONG academic initiative and STRONG background in mathematics

Full-year Course

In addition to greater depth of study in all topics in Precalculus, Honors PreCalculus covers advanced topics, including trigonometric identity proofs, polar equations, composition of functions, finite and infinite sequences and series, the binomial expansion, convergence proof by induction, and regression analysis. Term projects may also be expected.

     Introduction to Calculus (MAT250)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PreCalculus

Full-year Course

After a review of functions and function behavior from Pre-Calculus, students will learn the basics of differentiation for the standard functions, sums, products, quotients and basic compositions of functions, beginning integration, and applications of those including business, physical, and geometric problems. These will prepare students to finish their study of Calculus 1 incollege.

     Advanced Placement AB Calculus (MAT252)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Precalculus

Full-year Course

This course follows the College Board® standards for Advanced Placement Calculus AB. Topics include: those of college Calculus I (and possibly Calculus II) courses. This will include limits, derivatives, integration, Riemann sums and other numerical estimation methods, function behavior, and applications of derivatives and integrals. The focus and pace of the course will be in preparation for taking the Advanced Placement exam in May. College credit may be earned for passing this exam. *See AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.

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Science

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SCIENCE

The minimum graduation requirements for Science are:

Pass three years of a lab-based Science including Biology

     Biology (SCI312/THS312)

Full-year Course

This course or its equivalent portion (e.g., Biology Honors) is required for all ninth grade students. Includes units on biological themes, cell structure and function, classification, bacteria and viruses, human anatomy and physiology, biochemistry, cell growth and division, and cell reproduction, heredity, genetics, nucleic acids, evolution, speciation, photosynthesis, cellular respiration & protein synthesis, populations & biodiversity, ecology, and environmental science. Students will demonstrate proficiency via laboratory work as well as traditional assessments.

     Biology II (SCI313)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology

Full-year Course  

Students enrolled in this course will cover the Massachusetts Biology Frameworks in preparation for taking the MCAS. The course will cover topics in a different order and with different activities than SCI312.  The course will focus on further development of content knowledge and test taking strategies.

     Biology Honors (THS315)

Full-year Course

Similar to biology with more detailed lab work, project work and research paper. A greater degree of self reliance is needed for this fast- paced course. Biology Honors provides opportunities for students to explore the concepts in life science in an intensive academic environment. Students will be actively engaged in investigations of topics such as: Ecosystems, Biogeochemical Cycles (energy transfer in biological systems), Cell Biology, Principles of Heredity, Biochemistry, Evolution, Biological History, and Plant

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and Animal Physiology. The concepts associated with these topics will be examined through laboratory investigations, modeling, interactive investigations, reading assignments (homework) and some lecture. Students will study and apply scientific method to their lab work, which will involve the implementation of laboratory technique, the use of laboratory equipment and math skills. Through these investigations, students will be able to relate scientific principles to themselves and to the world around them.

     Chemistry In The Community (SCI322)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in Algebra IB

Full-year Course

Chemistry in the community, based on a curriculum created by the American Chemical Society, is structured around societal issues related to chemistry - rather than around specific chemical concepts, which is how a traditional chemistry course is structured. Chemistry in the Community, or “ChemComm” is designed primarily for students who are planning to earn a degree in a field other than science from a four-year college. The goals of the course are to help students realize the role chemistry plays in their daily lives and to assist them in making informed decisions about issues involving chemistry, science, and technology. The course consists of a great number and variety of student activities and emphasizes the major concepts, vocabulary, skills, and laboratory techniques expected in an introductory Chemistry course. Students will apply basic algebra skills, such as solving one-variable equations, to problem-solving through hands on laboratory investigations. Assessments will include tests and quizzes, laboratory reports, writing assignments, and problem-solving exercises.

     Chemistry (SCI326) Lab (LAB326)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra IB or its equivalent

Full-year Course

This quantitative course is designed for students who plan to attend a four year college. Topics covered include properties of matter, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, gases and kinetic molecular theory, solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium and kinetics, nuclear chemistry, fission and fusion, thermo chemistry, oxidation-reduction and electrochemistry.

     Chemistry Honors (SCI327) Lab (LAB327)

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra IB or its equivalent

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Full-year Course

This rigorous course requires a high level of critical thinking and mathematical skills. Like SCI326,it is designed for students who plan to attend a four year college and is especially helpful to those planning on a career in science or health. Topics include properties of matter, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, gases and kinetic molecular theory, solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium and kinetics, thermo chemistry, oxidation-reduction and electrochemistry. Most concepts will be supported with student-executed laboratory investigations. Students will be expected to use both English and mathematics as languages with which to substantiate their work.

     Earth Science (SCI321)

Full-year Course

This course entails the study of two fields of Earth Science. Semester I consists of the study of the planet Earth through its entire history. Fundamental geologic concepts are covered, beginning at the formation of the solar system and planets and moving onward to the formation of continents, oceans, atmosphere and life here on Earth. Each geologic time period will require the study of rocks, physical processes, atmospheric and oceanic changes and life. Major milestones, such as more complex life in the ages of fish, amphibians, reptiles, dinosaurs and mammals, will be an important focus. Semester II includes the study of atmospheric structure and characteristics, cloud types and associated weather, earth geometry and Earth-Sun relationships, such as seasons. Weather and basic weather prediction, including the interpretation of balloon and satellite data, will be addressed, with emphasis on storms such as tornadoes, hurricanes, lightning, blizzards, hail and floods. The last few weeks of the year are spent studying global climate change and its direct impact on New England.

     Biomedical Science (SCI330)

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Biology

Full-year Course

Students will gain an understanding of major issues influencing biomedical science today. Topics covered include: biomedical careers, genetics, reproductive technologies, micro-pathology, immunology, neuro-anatomy and physiology as well as basic biological forensics testing. Students will also develop an appreciation of the rapidly progressing biomedical explosion that will affect how they live, die, and reproduce. Class time will be spent reviewing current magazine/journal articles dealing with biomedical issues, participating in full-class and small-group discussions, working on research projects, performing laboratory investigations, completing and grading written assignments, and

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listening to lecture style notes or video presentations.

     Anatomy and Physiology (SCI332)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of both Biology and Chemistry

Full-year Course

Students of this course will learn accurate and current information concerning the structure and function of the human body. Human Biology emphasizes the complementary nature of structure and function, homeostasis and homeostatic mechanisms, the interaction between humans and their environment, metabolic processes, responses to stress, pathological disorders and diseases, and phases in the human life cycle. To achieve a mastery of this material, students will read, comprehend, and apply lecture and college level text material. Students will use critical thinking and writing skills to analyze experimental data collected in the laboratory classroom. Laboratory work is included and may include dissections.

     Environmental Science I (SCI336)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Algebra IB or its equivalent

Semester Course

This course entails the study of ecosystems – ecosystem structure, biomass, and E cycling, biogeochemical cycles, organism interactions, and succession. Aquatic ecosystems to include vernal pools, ponds, streams, and rivers will be studied in detail in the field, laboratory, and classroom. A substantial amount of time is spent conducting research outside on the campus grounds as well as off-campus. Mandatory field classes and field trips will be conducted year-round regardless of the season and the weather. In addition, forest ecosystems will be studied during the colder months. This course is designed so that students may gain experience in applied environmental study.

     Environmental Science II (SCI337)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Algebra IB or its equivalent

Semester Course

This course consists of the study of energy, alternative energy, and a brief survey of pollution and environmental laws. The alternative energy topics to be studied include active solar, passive solar, solar hot water systems, geothermal heating and cooling, wind turbines, wave turbines, biomass, landfill-gas emission capture generating plants, bio-diesel fuel alcohol, switch grass, algae, hydrogen cells, and hybrid systems like co-generations for the home and gas/diesel electric hybrid automobiles.

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     Advanced Placement Environmental Science (SCI341)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology andAlgebra IB or its equivalent; concurrent enrollment in Chemistry is

recommended

Full-year Course

Advanced Placement Environmental Science is a laboratory-based class that is the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in Environmental Science; it is recommended for highly motivated students in their sophomore, junior or senior years. This course provides students with the principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships and dynamics of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and anthropogenic, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to investigate and evaluate alternative solutions for their mitigation or prevention. Students will participate in both short- and long-term research projects, and a large portion of the first semester will consist of extensive field study of the local environment (WSHS campus and Mittineague Park ecosystems). Due to the quantitative analysis required in the course, students should be comfortable using algebra and performing calculations on tests without a calculator. Students are expected to complete nightly readings from a college-level text and other publications. Summer reading is required. The course will prepare students to take the College Board Advanced Placement Environmental Science exam, given in May. *See AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.

     Conceptual Physics (SCI304)

Prerequisite: Successful completion Algebra IB or its equivalent

Full-year Course

This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore the fundamental concepts of physics through the use of mathematics. Conceptual Physics is designed primarily for students who are planning to attend a four-year college and earn a degree in a field other than science. Students are actively engaged in investigations of topics such as: linear motion, Newton’s Laws, momentum, work, energy, power, heat, static electricity, circuits, electromagnetism (motors), harmonic motion, waves, and the electromagnetic spectrum. Students learn about and apply the scientific method to their lab work. Through these investigations, students observe and draw conclusions.

     Physics (SCI338)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II

Full-year Course

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This quantitative course is designed for students who plan to earn a science degree at a four year college. The areas covered include mechanics, properties of matter, heat, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism.  The course stresses logical reasoning. Methods of study include both empirical (experimental) and mathematical (theoretical) approaches.  Many of the situations involve problem solving; therefore, a reasonable degree of mathematical skill is necessary.

     Advanced Placement Physics I (SCI343)

Prerequisite: Completion of or enrollment in Precalculus; a knowledge of algebra is assumed

Full-year Course

As the College Board describes this course, “AP Physics 1... focus[es] on the big ideas typically included in the first semester of an algebra-based, introductory, college-level physics sequence… and provide[s] students with enduring understandings to support future course work in the sciences.  Through inquiry-based learning, students will develop critical reasoning and thinking skills….”  Topics covered in AP Physics 1 are: kinematics; dynamics (Newton’s Laws of Motion); circular motion and the universal law of gravitation; simple harmonic motion; impulse, momentum and conservation of momentum; collisions; work, energy and the conservation of energy; rotational motion, including torque, moment of inertia, angular kinematics, rotational kinetic energy, conservation of angular momentum; electrostatics; direct-current circuits (resistors and voltage sources only); mechanical waves and sound.  Teaching methods focus on developing critical-thinking skills and will include guided inquiry, with a student-centered philosophy. Hands-on laboratory activities are a key component of this course. The course will prepare students to take the College Board Advanced Placement Physics 1 exam, given in May.

*See AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.

     Advanced Placement Biology (SCI340)

Prerequisite: Completion of Biology and Chemistry

Full-year Course

This course is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year and to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Biology Examination in May.  This course focuses on the major concepts in biology and their connections.  The course is structured around the four big ideas and the enduring understandings identified in the AP biology Curriculum Framework.  The course will focus on inquiry-based laboratory work and the use of the seven science practices in both lab and non-lab activities.  Summer reading is required.

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 *See AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.  Students planning a career in science should not take this course in place of Physics.

     Advanced Placement Chemistry (SCI346)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chemistry and Algebra II

Full-year Course

Designed for the serious science student who can work independently as well as with others, this course offers theory and laboratory experiences that parallel those of typical college-level freshmen courses for science majors including atomic theory and atomic structure, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, kinetic-molecular theory of gases, liquids and solids, solutions, reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, and descriptive chemistry. Significant emphasis is placed on the laboratory experience. *See AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.

     Astronomy (SCI316)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology

Semester Course

This elective course consists of a brief survey of astronomy so that students will gain a much better understanding of the basics of the Universe and their place in it. The topics to be studied include our solar system in its entirety from planetary geology to the asteroid belt, the constellations, telescopes and star viewing, star life cycles, energy and dark matter, space-time fabric and time travel. The end of the semester will involve a brief introduction to some of the missions, past, present and future, designed to explore our solar system and the possibility for life to exist beyond the Earth.

     Bird Biology (SCI317)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology

Second semester Course

This course is designed in order to allow students to further explore the study of birds otherwise known as Avian Biology or Ornithology. Subjects covered will include avian anatomy, behavior, conservation, distribution, ecology, evolution and identification, with an emphasis on birds of New England. This class will meet many days outside, in both good and bad weather.

     Mammal Biology (SCI320)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology

First semester Course

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This course is designed in order to allow students to further explore the study of mammals. Subjects covered will include mammalian anatomy, behavior, conservation, distribution, ecology, evolution and identification, with an emphasis on mammals of New England. This class will meet many days outside, in both good and bad weather.

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Social Studies Pathways

     

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SOCIAL STUDIES

The minimum graduation requirements for Social Studies is:

15 Credits of Social Studies including the equivalent of 2 US History Courses

Core Courses

     Modern World History (SST170/THS170)

Full-year Course

This course will cover the development of World Cultures in both the Western and Non-Western worlds. Students will be introduced to major social, political, cultural and religious developments through topics such as The Age of Absolute Monarchs; The Enlightenment; The Age of Revolutionary Change; Industrialization and Nationalism; the World in the Era of The Great Wars; and The Contemporary World post -1945.

     U.S. History I A 1763-1832 (SST183)

Semester Course

This is the first course of a four-semester U.S. History requirement. Through a study of the major founding documents – the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Federalist Papers - the course will examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United States during the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras with particular emphasis on the development of American democracy and government. This course is a college preparatory course that will emphasize the mastery of writing skills, document analysis skills, note taking skills, and organizational and problem solving skills.

     U.S. History I B 1832-1890 (SST184)

Semester Course

This is the second semester in American history and will cover America’s westward expansion, the establishment of political parties, economic and social change, sectional conflict, the Civil War and Reconstruction. This college preparatory course will continue to emphasize critical thinking and writing skills through a variety of instructional approaches in combination with individual and group projects and presentations.

     U.S. History I Honors/Pre-AP 1607-1877 (SST136)

Full-year Course

This is an in depth course that prepares students for enrollment in Advanced Placement

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United States History. Reading requirements as well as the depth and pace of the course necessitate that good time management and study skills are a must. Students enrolling in this course should possess excellent reading, writing and critical thinking skills and be motivated to accept responsibility for outside work on both short and long term assignments. Summer reading is required.

     U.S. History II A 1890-1945 (SST193)

Semester Course

The third semester in American history, this course begins with a review of Reconstruction and traces the major social, political, and economic events through the 19th century, including the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and America’s growing role in international affairs. Because this is a college preparatory course, it is expected that students will have acquired the academic and organizational skills and content knowledge necessary to meet State standards and requirements for graduation. Students will be expected to complete a number of outside writing and research projects.

     U.S. History II B 1945- Present Day (SST194)

Semester Course

This fourth semester of a two-year U.S. History requirement focuses on the United States in the Twentieth and Twenty-first centuries, beginning with the development of the United States as a world power. The growth of Big Government will be addressed through a study of the Progressive Era, the New Deal, and the Great Society. Students will also learn about the various factors that led to America’s entry into World War I and II as well as the consequences of World War II for changes in American life. Finally, students study the causes and courses of the Cold War, important economic and political changes during the Cold War, such as the Civil Rights Movement, and recent events and trends that have shaped modern-day America. Class participation, critical thinking and writing skills and numerous outside individual and group projects are requirements of the course.

Elective Courses

     Advanced Placement U.S. History (SST148)

Full-year Course

Advanced Placement U.S. History is a college level course that is recommended for juniors and seniors who are highly motivated and have excellent skills in reading and writing. The course will follow the prescribed content recommended by the College

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Board, providing an in-depth study of American History from the colonial period to the present day. The Advanced Placement course will cover subjects in U.S. History which reflect the emphasis found on the Advanced Placement examination: political institutions and public policy; social change; economic development and changes; diplomacy and international relations; and culture and intellectual developments. *See AP Student Performance Expectations onPage 3.

     Advanced Placement European History (SST203)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Modern World History, U.S. History I and II

Recommended for juniors or seniors

Full-year Course

This course in European History is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory course in history. The AP European History course is a survey of the history of Europe from the end of the Middle Ages until the end of the Cold War. The course will cover the major events and themes of European political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social, and economic history that have played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which we live. The course will also focus on the development of the modern European nation-state. In addition to understanding the factual narrative and themes of European History, students will be expected to analyze historical evidence and express that understanding and analysis in writing. The course will prepare students to take the AP European History exam. *See AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.

     Advanced Placement U.S. Government (SST149)

Prerequisite – Successful completion of US History IA & B

Full-Year Course

This course is designed to provide students with a deeper understanding of American Government and the major Political developments between our Nation's founding and the present day. Students will be asked to analyze and evaluate the United States Constitution and the principles of Democracy as well as the workings for the American Political Process. Use of guest speakers, classroom debate, position papers, and trips to Local and State centers of government will all highlight the course and make the connection of history, government and current events.

     America's Native Peoples: Amerindian and European - Contact through the Present Day (SST207)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History IA & IB and/or English 10  

Semester Course

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This course will focus on the Amerindian (Native American) Peoples of North America and their relationship with both European Powers and the American Government from contact (the moment when two people first meet) through the present day. Students will engage in exploratory learning, do research based projects, engage in archaeology and begin working in Ethno-history, a relatively new and exciting field of history that deals with cultural exchange and speculation in an attempt to reconstruct the past in a systematic and believable way using both anthropology and archaeology as a base. The course is designed to reinforce prior learning through a standards based approach to learning and to provide an in depth survey of the First Peoples of our continent: people who are now little more than a memory found on street signs or as the mascots for sports teams. This course is not available during the SY2016-2017.

     Big History (THS177) (9)

Semester Course

Big History weaves evidence, insights and research from a variety of subjects across 13.8 billion years of history into a single, cross-disciplinary story of the universe.  In this course students will be exposed to a holistic view of the world in order to grasp history as a whole and understand the relationships that exist between all of their subjects from Math to Music.  In doing so students will explore a timeline that spans from the beginning of the universe to the present day and will move towards understanding how our actions now could inform our personal and collective future.  Big History is a student centered, self reflective and inquiry based class that encourages students to think about history in a new way. This course is not available during the SY2016-2017.

     Domestic Contemporary Issues (SST174)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History IA & IB and/or English 10

Semester course

This course will introduce students to domestic problems that Americans currently face and the challenges it must address in the 21

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st Century. Topics examined may include: the American family, violence, crime, poverty, education, racism, drug abuse, abortion, and the political climate in America. Contemporary film enhances our investigation into these issues. This is a discussion-oriented class so attendance and participation are crucial. In addition, students will read news articles, watch news programs and develop research skills as they engage in a variety of projects. Students are expected to share their opinions on the topics covered, and to respect the opinions and viewpoints of others.

     Global Contemporary Issues (SST167)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History IA & IB and/or English 10

Semester Course

This course will cover global issues focusing on the last 50 years. Human rights violations are a major theme that begins our course. Other topics include terrorism, global warming and the environment, immigration, genocide and war as well as social activism. Contemporary film enhances our investigation into these issues. This is a discussion-oriented class so attendance and participation are crucial. In addition, students will read news articles, watch news programs and develop research skills as they engage in a variety of projects. Students are expected to share their opinions on the topics covered, and to respect the opinions and viewpoints of others.

     The Greco-Roman World (SST208)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History IA & IB and/or English 10

Semester Course

In this semester long course students will explore the history and legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome. Emphasis will be placed on connecting these “Cradles of Western Civilization” with the United States and the Western World today through comparative history. Readings in Classical History, connections with our Latin Class and examinations of the great characters of the Ancient world, from Socrates through Flavius Aetius will be a strong course component. The course will be standards based with a multidisciplinary approach covering everything from the Arts through Political History and serve as a firm platform to begin a liberal arts education, and better understand the workings of Western Democracies and our own Great Republic today. This course is not available during the SY2016-2017.

     History of Society & Social Institutions I (SST204)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History IA & IB and/or English 10

Semester Course

This course is designed to introduce students to the history and development of the

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society around them. Ultimately, students will become aware of the issues that mold society and shape our everyday lives. Students will come to this understanding through readings and writings of noted researchers, critically viewing the media, and through active class participation and discussion. This course is not available during the SY2016-2017

     History of Society & Social Institutions II (SST205)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History IA & IB and/or English 10

Semester Course

This course is designed for students to develop a historic and social understanding of American institutions such as family, education, politics and economics. This course also studies the development of discrimination and its effects on society. Students will come to this understanding by studying writings of noted researchers, critically viewing the media, and through active class participation and discussion. This course is not available during the SY2016-2017

     Intellectual History &The Human Mind (SST200)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History IA & IB and/or English 10

Semester Course

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Psychology covers everything that people think, feel, and do. This course is designed to give students a broad introduction to topics such as the background and fields of psychology, the workings of the mind and body as well as sense and perception. Concepts of motivation, emotions and altered states of consciousness are also studied. This course requires strong analytical and critical thinking skills as well as an ability to work independently and in groups on various experiments and projects. Strong academic and organizational skills are suggested for successful completion of this course.

     Intellectual History &The Mind II (SST201)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History IA & IB and/or English 10

Semester Course

This course is a continuation of Psych. I and begins by exploring the developmental changes from infancy to old-age. Additional topics include personality theories and psychological testing, stress and conflict, psychological disorders as well as therapy and change. This course requires strong analytical and critical thinking skills as well as an ability to work independently and in groups on various experiments and projects. Strong academic and organizational skills are suggested for successful completion of this course. 

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     Military History of the United States IA: 1607-1865, (semester 1 only) (SST185)

Military History of the United States IB: 1865-2008 (semester 2 only) (SST186)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History IA & IB and/or English 10

Semester Course

This course allows students to explore the American Military History from the founding of the Colonies through the present day. Topics covered in the course will include Leadership and Command, Technology and War, Strategy, Tactics, Logistics, War and Society, War as seen in American Art and Literature, the legacy of war and historical preservation as well as the change wrought by technology and America’s entry into the “World Stage” (in the World Wars) and rise to Hyper-Power status. The course will be chronological and “power-standard” driven, doing justice to the causation and conclusion of wars, as well as their prosecution. Inquiry based learning, differentiated instruction, local and regional field trips, simulation gaming and technology driven instruction and inquiry will all play a strong role in the course.

     Religions of the World (THS173) (9)

Semester Course

Religions of The World is a dynamic introduction to the living traditions and history of the major religions of the modern world. The course is designed to introduce students to both the dynamic nature of different religions as well as their continuity across time. Religions of the World will draw upon a wide variety of resources including history, literature, sociology, language, science and art in order to expose students to the diversity of religious views, but also to compare the common values shared by all faiths. An exploration into our deepest values and shared humanity allows students to explore the meaning of diversity and build successful relationships between people of varied religious backgrounds. A course in Religions of The World can be a platform to address the intolerance and bigotry challenging the formation of a respectful and multicultural 21st century world. This course is not available during the SY2016-2017

     We Won’t Get Fooled Again – How American Politics & Government Works (SST206)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History IA & IB and/or English 10

Semester Course

This course will include an in-depth discussion of the Constitution, including branches of government, selected amendments, and the founding principles of federalism and republicanism in both an historical and contemporary contest. In addition, further examination of the operation of political parties, roles of lobbyists and special interests, historical presidential campaigns and their outcomes, the history of the vote, as well as

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key US Supreme Court decisions will be part of the curriculum. Students will develop a sense of their role in the politics in America. This course is not available during the SY2016-2017.

     The World Today: Contemporary Issues (THS175) (9)

Semester Course

In this course students study the major issues confronting the United States and the World today. Integrating 1/1 technology and consistent 21st Century Skills, students discover the multitude of forces that will drive the events of their lives. Areas of study will include International Terrorism, Infectious Diseases, Women's Studies including Women’s changing roles in the military, Global Economics, Increasing diversity, Politics, Evolving Technologies and much more. The coverage of this course is meant to reflect what is happening in the world today, and that means it is ever changing! This course is not available during the SY2016-2017.

SHELTERED ENGLISH IMMERSION (SEI) PROGRAM

SEI Content Block for Beginners - This five-period, five-course block uses content-based activities to develop speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in English. The five classes include:

     ESL English Beginning (ESL100)

Prerequisite: One of five courses for SEI Content Block for Beginners

Full-year Course

This course covers the basics of English from phonological awareness to the tasks of writing and reading both stories and informational texts. Learning strategies that help students develop language and academic skills are emphasized.

     ESL Reading and Vocabulary (ESL101)

Prerequisite: One of five courses for SEI Content Block for Beginners

Full-year Course

This course focuses on vocabulary development and pronunciation, word analysis, and

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reading strategies through the study of a variety of fiction and nonfiction texts.

     SEI Biology (SEI312)

Prerequisite: Open to any student in the SEI Program

Full-year Course

This biology course which shelters content for English language learners focuses on the language and concepts of biology. Units on biological themes includes: The Chemistry of Life, Cell Biology, Genetics, Anatomy and Physiology, Evolution and Biodiversity, and Ecology.

     Basic Concepts of Social Studies (ESL104)

Prerequisite: Open to Beginning language learners

Full-year Course

This course focuses on the language and skills of Social Studies, with an emphasis on geography and American culture. It will expose learners to the basic maps, historical events, figures, and symbols related to the United States, the Western Hemisphere, and the world. It will also introduce American government through the study what it means to be an American.

     ESL Concepts of Math (ESL108)

Prerequisite: One of four courses for SEI Content Block for Beginners

Full-year Course

This course focuses on the language of mathematics. Students learn the English terms for math concepts and operations as they review and practice solving word problems.

     ESL English Early Intermediate (ESL092)

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

Full-year Course

This course is for students who are approaching fluency in English and need academic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Vocabulary, learning strategies, academic speaking, grammar, and writing skills are developed through thematic literature units. This course is scheduled for 2 periods, 10 credits.

     ESL English High Intermediate (ESL093)

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

Full-year Course

This course continues the development of all four skill areas with a focus on reading and

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writing for academic purposes. The emphasis in this course will be on vocabulary development, authentic world literature, and essay writing. This course is scheduled for 2 periods, 10 credits.

     SEI English Advanced (ESL094)

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

Full-year Course

This course focuses on vocabulary development and pronunciation, writing skills, grammar usage, and mechanics. Students learn the process for and practice writing descriptive, narrative, expository, and persuasive essays. Students read pieces from a variety of genres, focus on reading comprehension and analysis, and complete a research project. This is a transitional course which prepares students for mainstream English.

     SEI Modern World History (SEI103)

Prerequisite: One of five courses for SEI Content block

Full-year Course

This course focuses on the language of Social Studies and emphasizes note-taking, speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills, particularly through projects and presentations. Students learn English terms for concepts of history, geography, government, and economics. The course centers on influential world civilizations and historical events chronologically from Mesopotamia to the age of European exploration and colonization.

     SEI U.S. History I (SEI131)

Prerequisite: Open to Early Intermediate and High Intermediate ELL students only

Full-year Course

This year-long course satisfies the first half of the U.S. History requirement and shelters content for English Language Learners. Content covers American History from colonial times, through the establishment of American democracy and government, to the Civil War and Reconstruction. Required tasks will emphasize note-taking, organizational writing, and critical thinking skills, particularly through projects and presentations.

     SEI U.S. History II (SEI132)

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Prerequisite: Open to High Intermediate or with teacher recommendation

Full-year Course

This year-long course satisfies the second half of the U.S. History requirement and shelters content for English Language Learners. Content reviews Reconstruction and then focuses on America’s industrialization and expansion. It keys in on WWI, the Great Depression, WWII, the Cold War, as well as domestic and international events that have shaped modern America. Required tasks will emphasize writing, organizational research and critical thinking skills through projects and presentations. This class will also prepare students to take the U.S. Citizenship Exam.

     SEI Algebra IA (SEI218) and SEI Algebra IB (SEI219)

Prerequisite: Open to Early Intermediate and High Intermediate language learners

Full-year Course

This course meets the same curriculum frameworks as Algebra IA (MAT205/THS210) and Algebra IB (MAT215/THS215) as it shelters content for English language learners.

     SEI Geometry (SEI233)

Prerequisite: Open to High Intermediate or with teacher recommendation

Full-year Course

This is a geometry course which shelters content for English language learners.

     SEI Introductory Physics (SEI308)

Prerequisite: Open to Early Intermediate and High Intermediate language learners only

Full-year Course

This is a physics course which shelters content for English language learners.

     SEI Integrated Biology (SEI313)

Prerequisite: Open to any student in the SEI Program

Full-year Course

This course is designed to help students realize the role biology plays on their daily lives and to assist them in making informed decisions about biology, science and technology. A variety of activities that emphasize the major biological concepts, vocabulary, the language of biology as well as laboratory work will be used to explore these various areas of study.

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Elective Offerings

It is recommended that students who are enrolled in the SEI content block for beginners should enroll in one of the following elective courses – Art, Graphic Design, Piano, Computer Art, Desktop Publishing, SEI Keyboarding/Computer Skills, or SEI Computer Essentials.

     SEI English Skills & MCAS Preparation (SEI052)

Prerequisite: Open to English Language learners at the Intermediate level and above

Full-year Course

This course will help students develop their English skills in grammar, mechanics, usage, vocabulary and composition. The goal for the course is to prepare language learners for (1) success in their regular English class and for (2) success on the ELA MCAS tests.

     SEI Keyboarding/Computer Skills (SEI551)

Semester Course

English language learners will develop skills and vocabulary used in the computer field, giving them a solid foundation upon which to build in future computer courses.  Keyboarding is an essential and enabling skill for all students and all workers. This course focuses on alphabetical keyboard learning, technique development, and keyboarding fluency, accuracy and speed. There will be no numerical grade, it is offered as a PASS/FAIL course.

     SEI Computer Essentials (SEI552)

Prerequisite: SEI Keyboarding/Computer Skills (SEI551)

Semester Course

This course is designed as an extension to the SEI Keyboarding/Computer Skills course. English Language learners will continue to build their vocabulary in order to give them a basic understanding of personal computers, PC components, computer terminology and Windows XP.  Students will get a brief introduction to word processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation programs. There will be no numerical grade, it is offered as a PASS/FAIL course.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Students who meet the standards for foreign language learning of the Massachusetts Foreign Language Curriculum Frameworks will be able to communicate in languages other than English; gain knowledge and understanding of other cultures; connect with other disciplines and acquire information; develop insight into the nature of language and culture; and participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world at appropriate levels of proficiency.

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     French I (FLA401)

Full-year Course

Students will acquire the basic skills of reading, listening, speaking and writing in French, along with basic grammatical rules and vocabulary. Students will explore the French-speaking countries of the world, their people and cultures in order to make language learning a meaningful experience. Authentic media, such as French language television, videos, audio materials and Internet resources will be used to enhance learning activities.

     French II (FLA403)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French I

Full-year Course

Students will expand their communication skills in the target language and will be exposed to a wider range of published materials pertaining to the French-speaking areas of the world. Authentic media, such as French language television, videos, audio materials and Internet resources will become a consistent component in most learning activities.

     French III (FLA405)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French II

Full-year Course

Students will continue to expand their understanding of French sentence structure and their vocabulary range as they build on their ability to use spoken French meaningfully, and to comprehend more complex written materials. Students will discuss cultural themes and current events of the French-speaking world both orally and in writing. Authentic media, such as French language television, videos, audio materials and Internet resources will be used in many learning activities.

     French IV (FLA407)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French III

Full-year Course

Students will continue to acquire significant proficiency in the foreign language by constant use of French in the classroom. They will increase their range and depth of vocabulary and grammatical structures through readings and compositions. Reading selections may include online ad magazine newspaper articles, short stories, poems, and essays which are representative of the French-speaking world. Novels in French such as L’Enfant noir by CamaraLaye or L‘Étranger by Albert Camus may be read.

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     Advanced Placement French Language & Culture (FLA408)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French IV

Full-year Course

Students in this course are expected to obtain high levels of oral and written proficiency. Exclusive use of the target language is a critical component of the course. The class concentrates on in-depth work for the continued acquisition and mastering of the French language by refining the four skills of speaking, writing, listening, and reading comprehension using a wide variety of appropriate materials. All course activities are geared to preparing the students for successful performance on the Advanced Placement French Language & Culture examination and/or a French placement test at the beginning of the freshman year in college. Students will be expected to complete summer work prior to this course in September. *Please see the AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.

     Italian I (FLA421)

Full-year Course

This course is designed to provide the student with the basic materials necessary for a gradual and balanced learning of the language. Each lesson consists of a dialogue, basic vocabulary, conversational and composition material, the most common verbs and elementary grammar. Vocabulary, verbs, simple oral expression, and composition will be equally stressed so that the four skills of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing the language may be developed jointly. Finally, there will be introductory units on Ancient Italy, the Etruscans, and the Romans.

     Italian II (FLA423)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Italian I

Full-year Course

This program is a continuation of Italian I. The knowledge of the essential grammar and most common verbs should be completed. The range of basic vocabulary will be enlarged; and the four skills of understanding, speaking, reading, and writing will be strengthened. Oral expression and written composition will be stressed. There will be an extensive unit on the region of Veneto and a focus on Carnevale, the foundation of Venice and the Commedia dell’Arte.

     Italian III (FLA425)

Prerequisite Successful completion of Italian II

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Full-year Course

The main objective of this course is to continue the development of the four language skills of the student, and to provide him or her with an increased knowledge of Italian culture and civilization. This will be accompanied by a review of the basic materials acquired in Italian I and II, and by reading and lectures on short stories, legends and myths. Literature covered includes Boccaccio’s “Andreuccio da Perugia” and Collodi’sPinocchio. The cultural aspect of the course includes a focus on modern Italian music.

     Italian IV (FLA427)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Italian III

Full-year Course

The student is both encouraged and expected to use the language in all written and oral expression. Emphasis will be placed on polishing elementary and intermediate concepts of composition and syntax. Literature studied includes fables, folk/fairy tales from Italo Calvino.

     Latin I (FLA431)

Full-year Course

Basic grammatical structures graded reading passages, and a foundation in vocabulary allow students to read quickly and with confidence the Latin of classical authors. Students will explore various aspects of Roman civilization, including mythology, dress, slavery, and landmarks in the city of Rome. The course will also provide students with an awareness of Roman history from the Trojan War through the second Punic War. The value of classical language study as it influences one’s own cultural development, and supports and strengthens a student’s English language skills is stressed.

     Latin II (FLA433)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin I

Full-year Course

An in-depth study of basic Latin grammar is made so that more difficult selections may be read with understanding. The ongoing historical narrative begun in Latin I continues, moving from the collapse of the Roman Republic, through the Imperial period, up to Constantine. Students explore aspects of Roman civilization including food and dining, the Roman calendar, and gladiatorial combat. Intermediate-level graded reading passages prepare a student to handle primary source material in Latin III.

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     Latin III (FLA435)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin II

Full-year Course

Students will begin to read primary sources at this level. Readings of authors will be accompanied by continued grammatical study and acquisition of vocabulary. Texts read will progress historically throughout the late Republic and into the early Empire. Students will examine the style and content of historians via authors such as Cicero, Asconius, Eutropius, Augustus, Petronius and Pliny the Younger. Readings will include such topics as political transition, military exploits, judicial speeches, imperial publications, fictional works and letters.

     Advanced Placement Latin-Vergil (FLA438)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin III

Full-year Course

In this course the entire Aeneid of Vergil is read in great critical detail. Sections from Books I, II, IV ,VI, X and XII are read in the original. Students are expected to master syntactic, rhetorical and literary analyses of these segments. In addition, mastery of scansion in dactylic hexameter is expected. The entire Aeneid (Mandelbaum or Fitzgerald translation) will be read and discussed as part of the epic tradition in Western literature. Finally, there is additional study of Greco-Roman art, architecture, civilization, and culture, as well as the iconography of this Roman masterpiece. Students will be encouraged, although not required, to take the Advanced Placement Examination which is administered yearly in May. The exam lasts for three hours: A one hour multiple-choice section and a two-hour free response section. Depending on the score on the exam (5-1: highest - lowest) and the college to which the score is presented, the student may receive college credit for the course. *See AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.

     Spanish I (FLA441)

Full-year Course

Students are introduced to the basic skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening in Spanish as well as simple sentence structures and grammar rules. Vocabulary building is based on daily life situations that are age appropriate. The content of the course includes an exploration of Spanish speaking countries of the world, their people and their lifestyle, in order to provide a cultural context in which language learning becomes more meaningful.

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     Spanish II (FLA443)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish I

Full-year Course

This course is a continuation of Spanish I, and it is designed to increase students’ ability to understand and communicate in Spanish. An expanded range of basic vocabulary and sentence structures will enable students to function effectively in a wider variety of life-like situations. Independent oral expression and written composition will be stressed, as well a broader understanding of the Hispanic cultures.

     Spanish III (FLA445)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish II

Full-year Course

In this continuation of Spanish II, students will learn some complex grammar structures and abstract vocabulary. Spanish is used as the main tool for communication in the classroom. A wide range of audiovisual and authentic materials is used to familiarize students with a real-life approach to the target language. Students will conduct research on several cultural topics (art, literature, politics, history, customs, etc.) and complete a series of projects around their findings.

     Spanish IV (FLA447)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish III

Full-year course

The students will complete the overview of Spanish grammar, including all verb tenses and the most complex grammar structures. Students will learn a wide range of vocabulary items, from literary and formal terms to specialized language or idiomatic and informal expressions. The study of Hispanic cultures will continue to be expanded. With the purpose of obtaining a high level of oral and written proficiency, the target language will be used for most purposes in the classroom, and students will do extensive reading from a variety of authentic sources, such as newspapers, online articles and literary works.

     Advanced Placement Spanish Language (FLA448)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish IV

Full-year Course

The course’s objective is for students to develop high levels of oral and written

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proficiency in order to succeed in the Advanced Placement Spanish Examination. An integrated approach is used allowing students to be exposed to an extensive variety of authentic materials and resources. Communication exclusively in the target language is imperative during this course to help build the necessary confidence to perform successfully in all tasks given at the examination. Candidates for Advanced Placement Spanish are expected to complete summer work prior to the start of the course in September. *See AP Student Performance Expectations on Page 3.

COMPUTER, BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY

Computer Courses

     Practical Applications of Computers-Microsoft Office (CBS271)

Semester Course

This course is designed to teach students how to use the computer as a business and personal tool through the use of applications such as Microsoft Office and/or Google Apps. Students will perform word processing (Microsoft Word), online data collection, data analysis, spreadsheet and graph creation (Microsoft Excel), and electronic presentation tasks (Microsoft PowerPoint). Microsoft Office is the standard for applications in both the academic and business world today.

     Computer Art I (CBS292)

Semester Course

The student will use the computer as a new method of image making with software as the visual art material. The curriculum is designed for creative experimentation with drawing, painting, and animation through the use of the computer and peripheral devices. This course is highly recommended for all students especially those students pursuing careers in computer, design, and media related occupations. Students will be using Adobe Photoshop.

     Computer Art II (CBS294)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Art I

Semester Course

The student will explore further the topics introduced in Computer Art I with an emphasis on manipulation of illustrations and multimedia presentation. This course is highly recommended for all students especially those students further pursuing careers in computer, design, and media related occupations. Students will be using Adobe Illustrator.

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     Computer Science I (CBS540)

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra 1A suggested but not required

Semester Course

This one-semester course introduces students to the basics of computer science through a series of Python programming projects that encourage creativity and experimentation. Students create a diverse portfolio of projects as they learn commands and functions, values and variables, Graphical User Interface, modular and object-oriented programming, and events and event-driven processes. Students also learn loops, debugging techniques, software development processes, arrays and sets, generators and namespaces, packages and libraries, randomness, file handling, and how to program simple games. Students explore careers in programming, including profiles from a wide variety of programming professionals. *This course description is taken from Edgenuity "Computer Science."

     Computer Science II (CBS541)  

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Science I

Semester Course

This course advances the student’s knowledge of Python software and programming skills through a series of complex programming projects that require creative thinking and problem solving. Students learn arrays and sets, generators and namespaces, loops, packages and libraries, randomness, and file handling. Students also learn to program simple games. Students explore careers in programming, including profiles from a wide variety of programming professional

     Internet Use & Web Page Design (CBS299)

Semester Course

This course is designed to further establish a student as digitally literate. A digitally literate student uses technology strategically to find and evaluate information, acts in a manner online that is both safe and ethical, connects and collaborates with others, and produces and shares original content using web-based tools and design applications. Topics will include the history of the internet, search engines and strategies, internet safety, web site evaluation, Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and web page design layout using Dreamweaver. This course is highly recommended for all students especially those who plan on pursuing careers in computer media related occupations.

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     Video Production I (CBS542)

Semester Course

The process of digital video development and production is covered as students work on projects using non-linear video editing techniques. Related topics include the history of film and traditional filmmaking. This course exposes students to several Broadcast Television career opportunities in the areas of Studio Production, News Production and Sports Production. The curriculum for this course is competency based with skills and associated tasks mirroring film/news production industry requirements.

     Video Production II (CBS550)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Video Production I

Semester Course

Students will write, script, shoot, direct and edit an original work. This course places a strong emphasis on community involvement, reading and creative writing; concepts of storytelling will be emphasized; excellent computer and writing skills are essential; regular internet-access is a requirement.  Students will learn about collaborative studio television production through production activities.  Acting for television will be reinforced. Students will be required to appear in front of the camera, as well as master all technical skills.

     The Morning Show (News Production) (CBS551)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Video Production I or II or teacher recommendation

Semester Course

Students will learn how to produce a news based program in this media course. The class will run like an actual news studio. Students will work as reporters, directors, anchors, investigators, writers and all other aspects of the production crew. The class will write and direct news programs to be played on the school's website to update parents, staff, students and the community of what is happening in West Springfield High School and its surrounding world. Segments vary from school news, sports, weather, important announcements, election coverage, world news, entertainment and more. Acting and performing for television will be reinforced. Students will be required to appear in front of the camera, as well as master all technical skills.

Business Courses

     Accounting IA (CBS552)

Semester Course

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Accounting is the language of business. This one-semester introductory course will introduce students to the nature of business, understanding and preparing financial information assisting a business/person in making viable financial decisions. Students will be introduced to double entry accounting procedures which will allow students to develop an understanding of how a business analyzes, records, and interprets financial information in a manual and computerized environment. Computers will be used for simulations and projects. The successful completion of this course will provide the student with an introduction into the world of accounting. This course is available during Semester 1.

     Accounting 1B (CBS553)

Semester Course

This course will provide students reinforcement in double entry accounting procedures and will allow students to develop an understanding of how a business analyzes, records, and interprets financial information in a manual and computerized environment. Students will learn to keep financial records for a service and a retail business. Principles covered include the bookkeeping cycle, debit/credit theory, financial statements, use of various journals and ledgers, worksheets, accounts receivable and payable, and payroll systems. Computers will be used for simulations and projects. The successful completion of accounting 1A and 1 B  will provide the student with a solid skill base in introductory accounting as well as entry level employment skills for use in the business community. This course is available during Semester 2.

     Accounting II (CBS547)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Accounting IA and Accounting IB

Full-year Course

This course will continue to stimulate and advance business knowledge. A greater emphasis will be placed upon actual concepts, standards, and principles followed by all professional accountants, in both public and private practice. Corporate accounting will be studied in much greater detail, giving students the ability to prepare more advanced financial statements. In addition, an even stronger emphasis will be placed on computerized/automated business simulations. Successful completion of this course will give the student an excellent background for further study at the college level, as well as direct employment opportunities.

     Business & Personal Law (CBS510)(11) (12)

Semester Course

This is a semester course designed to familiarize students with the law as it relates to

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business practices and how the law influences relationships in business and the world. Topics covered include ethics, criminal law, civil law, contract law, court and trial procedures, consumer rights, insurance, and real property. The course is designed for students to actively participate in learning fundamental legal principles, analyzing case studies, completing group projects as well as participating in visits from guest speakers.  The course provides a solid foundation for students planning to pursue the study of business at the college level or an entry level job in the business community.

     Court Systems and Practices(CBS511)(11) (12)

Semester Course

Students will explore various topics relating to the functions of the court systems of Massachusetts and the United States. The topics will include court system structure, jurisdiction, legal procedures, and the difference between criminal and civil law. Students will use critical thinking skills to analyze case facts, like witness statements and affidavits, physical evidence, and forensic evidence. Students will work together to construct sound legal arguments supporting and discrediting both sides of a given case. The students will write opening and closing statements, as well as direct and cross examination questions. Students will work through several short “mini” mock trials before participating in a whole class mock trial at the end of the semester. Students will be selected to participate in the mock trial as either witnesses or attorneys. Through the preparation and trials students will become familiar with trial procedure, rules of evidence and courtroom decorum. Students who enroll in the course should have an interest in the criminal justice system and a desire to use public speaking skills.

     Introduction To Entrepreneurship (CBS499)

Semester Course

This course is recommended as an elective in the 9th and 10th grade. Students will develop an understanding of how business affects their everyday lives. They will learn about the economic system and its role in business, how private enterprise works, how businesses are organized, how prices are determined and what role the government plays in business. Students will complete a work-flow simulation based on an imaginary small business community. Students learn by being responsible for the daily operations of their assigned business.

     Marketing (CBS852)

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Semester Course

Marketing includes all activities involved in getting goods and services from the producer to the consumer. Students will study how businesses develop products, give products brand names, evaluate their potential customers, study consumer behavior, and develop strategies to get new customers. They will also learn how to conduct marketing research. Mini projects and case studies will provide opportunities for practical application.

     Event Marketing Management (CBS854)

Semester Course

This course will provide an introduction to the business side of event planning. This will include such topics as marketing products through sports, hotel and hospitality, public image, event marketing, management functions and strategies, decision making and leadership. Students will create a promotional plan for an actual event.

     Personal Financial Management I (CBS855)

Semester Course

This course provides practical guidance for personal financial decision making. This course will focus on real life financial issues such as careers, budgeting, banking, credit, taxes, home ownership, automobiles, and various aspects of insurance. The aim of this course is to enhance a student’s comprehension of the various financial instruments and resources available and learn about real life financial planning by performing hands-on financial planning activities.

     Personal Financial Management II (CBS856)

Semester Course

This course is designed to continue more in depth discussions from the first course and provide students with a foundation of the investment field as well as government impact on investments. Specific areas of study will include an in depth look at stock exchanges, where and how to invest your money, and what a stockbroker actually does. Students will also study the impact of the Federal Reserve System. Students will complete a realistic stock market simulation allowing students an opportunity to buy and sell stock based upon their own investment decisions, which is an integral part of the learning experience.  

     Entrepreneurship (CBS501)

Semester Course

This course will help students be successful in creating and running a small business. The course will focus on academic skills, management concepts and practices and

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personal traits entrepreneurs need. This course will assist students in learning to identify, develop and apply their attitudes, abilities, skills and goals in the most effective way in both the local and international business community. The students will actually create a business and/or product as a project to apply their business knowledge. Students will be introduced to the new global customer. Business people dealing with the international market need to know both sides of the business picture.

Technology / Engineering

     Robotics A (TEN601) & B (TEN602)

Prerequisite for Robotics B: Successful completion of Robotics A

Semester Course

These courses will take a look at the process of designing, building and manufacturing in the engineering world.  Students will have the opportunity to understand and develop concepts using the engineering design process.  From identifying the problem, researching the needs determined by the problem, develop possible solutions, select the best solution, create a prototype, test and evaluation the design, communicate the design and redesign when necessary.  Students will participate in group and individual projects.  Topics range from electronics, manufacturing, construction, communications, power and energy, and biotechnology including basic robots.  This is not a programming course.

     Technical Writing (TEN605)

Semester Course

This one semester course focuses on the practical writing skills necessary to communicate in the 21st century workplace.  Technical writing is the type of written communication that is used when writing instructions and reports or sending E-mail.   This course will take the student through elements of technical writing which include; letter writing, manuals, newsletters,  specifications, brochures, flyers, PowerPoint presentations, graphics,  job searches, resumes, web pages and memo's.

*Presently All Technical Drawing Classes Are Using “Google Sketch-Up 8” Software

     Technical Drawing I (TEN681)

Semester Course

Technical Drawing is for those students who may be interested in planning and building things as their life's work. This would include careers such as drafter, architect, surveyor, engineer, interior decorator, designer etc. The course is designed to acquaint the student with the "Graphic Language of Industry". Topics covered will include using basic drafting tools, lettering, and dimensioning, descriptive geometry, working drawings, pictorial drawings and reproducing drawings. This class is a book and board drawing

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course students will not be using the computer. This course is available during Semester 1.

     Technical Drawing II (TEN682)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Technical Drawing I

Semester Course

This course is a continuation of Basic Technical Drawing I whose purpose is to instruct the student in the feature-based, parametric solid modeling system. Solid modeling is a system that allows an engineer to design in three dimensions using material properties as part of the process. This leads to designs that are clearer in scope and functionally correct. The course begins with an overview of CAD sketching environment where students learn to create 2D objects such as lines and arcs. Definition is then added to the sketch including numerical dimensions and geometric relationships. Solid features are created including extrusions and features of revolution. Students are instructed in the creation of work planes and placed features so that complicated solid models can be designed. Solids are then arranged into assemblies including using standard fasteners. Engineering drawing documentation is introduced in accordance with the ASME Y14.3. This course is available during Semester 2.

Pathways To Prosperity

The following courses are only available to students who are participating in the Pathways To Prosperity program

     Introduction to Engineering Technology for College Credit (3) (P2P100)

Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Physics and Algebra II 

Semester course

This course is an introduction to the concepts of Engineering Technology.  The major topics to be discussed will be the role that an engineering technologist plays in developing and manufacturing a world-class project.   Some of the critical skills required of the technologist are problem solving, teamwork, business communication, and effective writing.  The student will be introduced to these skills and will learn to apply them to the basic concepts of product design and quality concepts associated with a manufacturing environment.  Use of computer application software to solve problems in Engineering Technology will be emphasized.  The focus will be on continuous improvement methods brought about by the computer.  The student will become familiar with using spreadsheets, word processing, presentation software, and any other software for various industrial and manufacturing problems related to industrial environments.  Team projects in conjunction with lab assignments are desired to reinforce key

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engineering principles.

     P2P-X-Block: Designing and Communicating with Technology (1) (XBLP2P)

Semester course

This course is designed for students to use the Solidworks 3D design software so they are able to create technical drawings for multiple unit projects.  All project work will be accompanied by all parts of the writing process.  Not only will students use the writing process to draft ideas when collaborating with peers, they will also be expected to respond to their work with written reflection.  Most importantly, students will have to employ communication skills to complete tasks such as writing a letter proposal about their projects to a company stakeholder and also, planning a multimedia presentation for their peers to observe their work.

     Technical Drawing III – AutoCAD Drawing (TEN683)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Technical Drawing II

Semester Course

This course is a continuation of Technical Drawing II. The emphasis of the course is learning the fundamentals of creating production drawings. The beginning of the course includes orthographic projection, sectioning, auxiliary views, and assembly drawings. Students will be instructed on the basics of threads and fasteners that are used in the discipline of mechanical design. Students will be given an introduction to the tolerance of mating parts using standard ANSI fits and geometric tolerances. Projects are assigned to present the concepts of mechanical design principles using the CAD system. Both inch and metric applications are used. This course is available during Semester 1.

FINE & APPLIED ARTS

The minimum graduation requirements for Fine Arts are:

Pass the equivalency of one full year course in Fine or Applied Art

Courses designated with an * will meet MassCore Fine and Applied Art requirements

The fine arts student will interpret and express the world around him/her, will make aesthetic judgments, which will enable him to improve his surroundings; will become acquainted with the history of art and how it relates to the evolution of his own art; and will be prepared for further study in various avenues of fine art.

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Visual Arts

Foundations In Art

These prerequisite art courses provide students with an introduction to the visual language of art and the fundamentals in drawing and 2D & 3D design principles they will need for all future work in the visual arts.

     *Foundations In 2D Art (ART800)

Semester Course

Students will learn how and why compositional skills, line quality, value, form and space are important in drawings by working from observation. The 2D visual art problems will involve creating balanced works of art through a variety of materials and techniques. Students will be able to identify the elements of art (line, shape, space, color, texture, form, value) in the works of others and be able to practice and apply them with intention in their own visual artwork. Content related vocabulary will be developed through art appreciation exercises and critiques.

     *Foundations in 3D Art (ART801)

Semester Course

Investigations into 3D design principles such as form, space, scale, and texture will involve working with materials like wire, yarn, cardboard, plaster and clay. Units of study will explore the creative ways in which materials can be used as well as a multitude of  different types of construction methods and tools. There will be vocabulary quizzes, art appreciation exercises, and critiques.

     *Ceramics I (ART850)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Foundations in 2D and Foundations in 3D

Semester Course

In Ceramics I, students will explore clay’s potential for sculptural and functional forms. The semester will be divided with a quarter spent on hand building (pinch, coil and slab) and a quarter spent on wheel throwing with an emphasis on functional forms.  Students will also gain an understanding of how to treat a surface using underglazes and glazes. All students will learn basic techniques and study traditional aspects of ceramics from diverse cultural perspectives. All students will be expected to draw, design original works, read, participate in critiques, conduct research and present information. All students will be expected to contribute to the smooth running of the clay studio, including recycling clay, maintaining a safe and clean workspace, and working cooperatively to support classmates.

     *Ceramics II  (ART851)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Foundations in 2D, Foundations in 3D,

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and Ceramics I

Semester Course  

In Ceramics II students will build on the basic techniques learned in Ceramics I and move towards creating more advanced sculptural and functional forms that focus on personal invention and style.  Students will spend one half of the semester hand building and the other half building skill at wheel throwing.  All students will be expected to draw, design original works, read, participate in critiques, conduct research and present their findings. All students must contribute to the smooth running of the clay studio, including loading and unloading the kiln, recycling clay, and work cooperatively to support classmates. Students will also participate and contribute to the Empty Bowl Project.  

     *Ceramics III  (ART852)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Foundations in 2D, Foundations in 3D, Ceramics I and II

Semester Course

Ceramics III students will spend a half of the semester learning and practicing advanced techniques in wheel-throwing and hand-building in order to design a series of independent projects for the second half of the semester.  Requirements will include sketches, research, artist references, and written proposals.  All students will be expected to contribute to the smooth running of the clay studio, including loading and unloading the kiln, recycling clay, maintaining a safe and clean workspace and work cooperatively to support classmates. Students will also participate and contribute to the Empty Bowl Project.  

     *Design Challenge (ART855)

Semester Course

Where form and function meet there is an opportunity for invention. This art based course offers students the opportunity to creatively problem solve with and without restraints. If they can dream it they can create it. Students will look at the evolution of everyday objects, like the telephone, and consider how the design has changed with society and how society has changed with the design. Working independently, in small, and large groups students will re-design predictable objects like furniture and roller-coasters as well as objects of their own design and creative purpose. Materials will focus on reusable/recycled objects and typical art materials. Technology will be used to research and record work and learning. This is a completely hands on course focused on the creative aspect of design. Students interested or participating in the P2P program are encouraged to enroll. This is available to all students, no prerequisites are required.

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     *Drawing/Painting I (ART810)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Foundations in 2D Art and Foundations in 3D Art

Semester Course

Students in this course will expand on what they learned in 2D Foundations in order to solve 2D visual art problems. Students will record and interpret what they see by drawing from observation. They will learn the fundamentals of drawing by working from subject matter such as the figure, still life, landscape, and from their imaginations. Materials such as pencil, charcoal, conte crayon, oil and chalk pastel, colored pencil, pen and ink, and ink wash may be explored. There will be individual and class critiques, and homework. A sketchbook will be required. This course is available during Semester 1.

     *Drawing/Painting II(ART811)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drawing/Painting I

Semester Course

Students will continue to explore drawing and painting with the addition of color theory and how it relates to painting will be studied and applied in the form of color studies and in paintings.  Students may work with watercolor, tempera, and acrylic paint.  Mixed media will be explored and the students will paint on a variety of surfaces.   Students will work through a variety of painting techniques, experiences, and styles.  The history of painting will be discussed through presentations and videos.  There will be individual and class critiques, and homework. A sketchbook will be required. This course is available during Semester 2.

     *Drawing/Painting III (ART812)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Foundations in 2D, Foundations in 3D, Drawing/Painting I & II

Semester Course

Students will work with watercolor, tempera, and acrylic paint.  Color theory and how it relates to painting will be studied and applied in the form of color studies and in paintings. The history of painting will be discussed through slide presentations and videos. Students will research and present findings about an artist and/or art movement. A research journal (required) will serve as a roadmap to develop the path of the student’s work. There will be individual and class critiques, as well as homework. A digital portfolio will be created in lieu of a final exam.

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     *Sculpture/Mixed Media I (ART816)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Foundations in 2D Art and Foundations in 3D Art

Semester Course

Students in this course will expand on what they learned in 2D and 3D Foundations in order to solve visual art problems through mixed media. Focus will be on creating works with a variety of materials such as: wire, cardboard, plaster, paper pulp, found/collected objects and paper, and how they can be used for both construction and visual appeal. Students should be prepared to work with messy materials, participate in critiques, and work as members of a community art space. There will be individual and class critiques, and homework. A sketchbook will be required. This course is available during Semester 1.

     *Sculpture/Mixed Media II(ART817)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Sculpture/Mixed Media I

Semester Course

The student will continue exploring techniques such as; mask making, figure sculpture, installation/site specific sculpture, low and/or high-relief work, assemblage, and mixed media constructions. The student will have the opportunity to do individual research on sculptors, sculpture styles in art history, art careers, specific media and techniques that are of particular interest to him or her. Research and reflective analysis of works created by master artists from diverse cultures and media is required. Students interested in a career in 3D art fields: industrial design, architecture, interior design, ceramics, special effects, stage craft or set design, may begin building a portfolio for continuing study in the arts from this course. The history of sculpture will be discussed through presentations and videos.  There will be individual and class critiques, and homework. A sketchbook will be required. This course is available during Semester 2.

     *Sculpture/Mixed Media 3 (ART818)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Foundations in 2D and Foundations in 3D, Sculpture/Mixed Media I & II

Semester Course

Students will create original works of art demonstrating complexity as their skills increase. The course will also include basic drawing and concept development skills with the use of a research journal. This journal will serve as a roadmap to develop the path of the student’s work. The students will identify art movements and styles through historical research, cultural investigation, and field trips in order to help them develop their projects. Finding will be presented to classmates. There will be individual and class critiques, as well as homework. A digital portfolio will be created in lieu of a final exam.

     *Introduction to the History of Art (ART808)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Modern World History

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Semester Course

A survey of the history of art from the ancient world to the present. A course designed for the conscientious student planning to enter art school or for sheer enrichment. Reading, writing, research, and hands-on-studio activities are involved.

     *Graphic Design I (ART830)

Semester Course

This is an introduction into the world of design. Focusing on the elements of art and principles of design, students will learn fundamentals of art and vocabulary and techniques needed in becoming a commercial artist. Students will explore color theory, trademarks, layout, and typography through package design in the first level. Students will work through problems from conceptualization and organization to completion. Media will include collage, markers, colored pencils, tempera paint, and a variety of surfaces. Any student interested in careers in graphic design, marketing, or communications would greatly benefit from this course. Graphic design incorporates images and text in two dimensional artwork that is informative and targeted to a specific audience. This course is available during Semester 1.

     *Graphic Design II (ART831)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Graphic Design I

Semester Course

This is the continuation of the introduction into the world of design. Focusing on the elements of art and principles of design, students will learn fundamentals of art and vocabulary and techniques needed in becoming a commercial artist. Students will continue to explore color theory, trademarks, layout, and typography through posters, printmaking, and a variety of other design assignments at the 2nd level. Students will work through problems from conceptualization and organization to completion using a variety of media from tempera and acrylic paint, colored pencils, printmaking, assemblage, and mixed media. Any student interested in careers in graphic design, marketing, or communications would greatly benefit from this course. Graphic design incorporates images and text in two dimensional artwork that is informative and targeted at a specific audience. This course is available during Semester 2.

     *Graphic Design III (ART833)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Graphic Design II

Semester Course

This in a continuation of Graphic Design II. The focus will shift from the individual as an expert to working and exploring the design world as a team. Students will be required to

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“sell” their ideas and consider critical feedback and include changes in the final product. A more detailed approach to design will be employed. Time spent on conceptualization and drafts will be a large portion of the experience. Assignment will be multilayered and complex. The methods and media will remain the similar to Graphic Design I and II using the art elements and principles of design to guide the process. Technology will be incorporated as appropriate. Appropriation in art and advertising, 100 designs of 1 object, shoe and shoebox design are a few of the possible assignments. Any student interested in a career in graphic design, marketing, or communications would greatly benefit from this course. This course is not available during SY2016-2017.

     *Graphic Design IV (ART834)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Graphic Design II with instructor approval or successful completion of Graphic

Design III

Semester Course

This is a continuation of Graphic Design III. The focus will shift from the individual as an expert to working and exploring the design world as a team. Students will be required to “sell” their ideas and consider critical feedback and include changes in the final product. A more detailed approach to design will be employed. Time spent on conceptualization and drafts will be a large portion of the experience. Assignment will be multilayered and complex. The methods and media will remain the similar to Graphic Design I-III using the art elements and principles of design to guide the process. Technology will be incorporated as appropriate. Ice cream containers, maps, illustration and board games are a few of the possible assignments. Any student interested in a career in graphic design, marketing, or communications would greatly benefit from this course. This course is not available during SY2016-2017.

     *Photography I (ART814)

Semester Course

Requirement: Students must have their own digital camera.

An SLR or single-lens camera is recommended.  Basic Photography deals with the power and impact of visual images in our history and in our society.  This course covers the history of photography as well as methods of reading, understanding, and appreciating various types of visual images.  Students will learn basic concepts for acquiring digital images and the process of manipulating the images through the use of Adobe Photoshop software.  Visual and written presentations, as well as reading assignments and critiques are a substantial part of the course.  Students will produce a portfolio of digital photographic work.

     Photography II (ART815)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Photography I

Semester Course

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Requirement: Students must have their own digital camera

Students will learn advanced skills and techniques of image making with digital cameras and will further explore the world of digital image processing: including electronic scanning, using Adobe Photoshop software to prepare and modify images, image manipulation, printing, and preparing work for show. Students will utilize social media technology to journal and share their work with peers, teachers, and parents. Visual and written presentations, as well as reading assignments and critiques are a substantial part of the course. Students will produce a portfolio of digital photographic work

     Advanced Senior Art Studio I (ART860)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Foundations in 2D and Foundations in 3D, plus 3 other semesters in Art

Semester Course

This course is intended for students interested in a visual art (major or minor) degree or concentration.  Interested students will submit his or her proposal for advanced studio work in a focused area of study, to be pursued under supervision of a sponsoring art instructor. The work will contribute to the student’s portfolio. A digital portfolio will be created in lieu of a final exam.

     Advanced Senior Art Studio II (ART861)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Senior Art Studio I

Semester Course

This course is intended for students interested in a visual art (major or minor) degree or concentration.  Interested students will submit his or her proposal for advanced studio work in a focused area of study, to be pursued under supervision of a sponsoring art instructor. A portfolio, for college application, will result from the semester’s work in Advanced Senior Art Studio. A digital portfolio will be created in lieu of a final exam.

     Acting I (ART841)

Semester Course

This introduction to the basics of tools of an actor.  Students acting will focus on the fundamentals of voice, and stage movement and scene interpretation as well as reading plays.  Students will take part in numerous training activities, study the principles of stagecraft, and perform scenes. studies. Students will be expected to perform in front of an audience.  

     Acting II (ART842)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Acting I

Semester Course

This course continues to build on the physical, vocal and interpretive activities taught in

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Acting I, but at an advanced level.  Students will explore a wider variety of scripted performance pieces.   They will and participate in script analysis, building character and rehearsal techniques as they apply to scene work.  There will be an emphasis on cooperation, creativity, creating a character, group support, participation, and willing acceptance of direction..  This course will also explore the act of directing and producing a play.  Students in the class are expected to organize a production that they will perform in front of an audience.  

     Acting III (ART843)  

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Acting II

Semester Course

Students work to develop and refine acting skills: script analysis, character development, and rehearsal techniques. To support this, they will explore a variety of genres and styles. This course will place more emphasis on focus on directing and producing a play. Students in the class will organize a production that they will perform in front of an audience.

     Acting IV (ART844)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Acting III

Semester Course

Students will continue to refine acting skills.  Students will complete a research project on a playwright or an actor of their choosing, and present a one act play for an audience, contributing to the Fine Arts Festival. Script writing/development will be a focus for the course. The work is designed for students who are interested in acting as a profession, as they will build an audition portfolio and hone their audition skills.

     Concert Choir (MUS820)

Full-year Course

The WSHS Choir is a choral ensemble for any student grades 9-12 interested in singing a wide range of styles of music from a variety of cultures. Emphasis is placed on citizenship, posture, correct breathing, “choral diction”, developing sight-reading skills, and rehearsal and performance methods. Students are encouraged to participate in the choir all four years of their WSHS career. This group performs during and outside of regular school hours.

     Instrumental Music (MUS900)

Semester Course

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Through music and working with different instruments, including the piano, bells and all types of percussion instruments, music will help students with physical skills, concentration, language, and reading. One on one and in small group instruction students will work on specific goals whether it is fine motor skills, or increasing attention span with the use of music to motivate.

     Jazz Ensemble (MUS800)

Semester Course

The WSHS Jazz Ensemble will explore the history, style and application of musical techniques of several popular genres of the past 100 years. Dixieland, Swing, Bebop, Fusion, and Rock are a few of the genres that will be covered. Students will learn individual and ensemble playing techniques, improvisation in various styles, and play landmark works of jazz literature. Students are expected to be able to read music notation. An audition and meeting with the director prior to enrolling is necessary. There will be evening performances and the possibility of field trips that students will be expected to attend. Jazz Ensemble is intended for musicians who play trumpet, trombone, saxophone, vocals, piano, and guitar, bass and drums, although other instruments are welcome to audition. This course will address multiple areas of the Massachusetts Frameworks, including but not limited to singing, reading and notation, playing an instrument, improvise and compose at an experimental stage, critical response, understanding the connections between music and other art forms as well as core content areas such as physics, mathematics, social sciences and languages.

     Piano & Basic Theory I (MUS801)

Semester Course

Open to any student interested in learning basic piano skills as well as gaining a basic understanding of music theory. Students will learn how to read and perform music at the piano.

     Piano & Theory II (MUS814)

Prerequisite: Completion of Piano and Basic Theory I or permission of the instructor

Semester Course

This class is designed to further develop skills learned in Piano and Basic Theory I. The student’s understanding of music theory will be expanded upon.

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     Piano & Theory III (MUS818)

Prerequisite: Completion of Piano and Theory II or permission of instructor

Semester Course

This class is designed to further develop skills learned in Piano and Basic Theory. The student’s understanding of music theory will also be expanded upon.

     Band 9, 10, 11, and 12 (MUS815)(9), (MUS825)(10), (MUS835)(11), (MUS845)(12)

Prerequisite: Completion of West Springfield Middle School Band Program or teacher recommendation

Full-year Course

The West Springfield High School Band is an instrumental ensemble comprised of students in grades 9-12. Students in the band study and perform well-established band literature and new works of quality. The fundamentals of good playing are stressed. Through the study of several compositions each semester, this course seeks to develop the ideas and skills involved in independent playing and playing in a group setting. Enrollment in band entails marching band camp in late August, performances at home football games, parades, several concerts at the school and other civic functions throughout the school year. Students are expected to participate in all group activities.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH EDUCATION

The minimum graduation requirements for Physical Education/Health Education are::

Pass 4 semesters of combined PE/Health

     Physical/Health Education Grade 9/10 (PE9022) Semester course (PE9023)

Full-year Course

Emphasis will be placed on fitness and appropriate social interactions including: cooperation, teamwork, sportsmanship, and civility through a variety of individual and team activities. Topics during the study of health will include: components of health, stress management, eating disorders, STDs, environmental hazards, self-esteem, harassment/bullying, reproductive health, teen pregnancy, fetal development, self respect, decision making, and sleep deprivation.

     Physical/Health Education Grade 11/12 (PE9044)

Semester Course

Emphasis will be placed on developing competencies in fitness, lifetime activities, and

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wellness. Fitness concepts will be related to lifelong activities. Topic areas will include: communication, coping strategies, harassment/bullying, goal setting, heart disease, cancer, nutrition and disease, addiction, conflict resolution, contraception, HIV/AIDS, mental and emotional health, teenage depression, eating disorders, substance abuse, sexuality, relationship violence, coping with death and dying, and weight management.

Electives

     Backyard Games (PE8450)

Semester Course

This course will focus on the non-traditional games we find playing as a kid in our backyard. The course offering will be designed for all students who want to enjoy the leisure aspect of games. The course will include games such as: Kan Jam, Bocce, Horseshoes, Ladder Ball, Badminton, and Spike Ball. Backyard games will give students the opportunity to broaden their knowledge of potential physical activity outside of school. These games can help increase critical thinking, decision making, and give all students the knowledge needed to help maintain a lifetime of physical activity.   This course is available only to students in grade 12.

     Child Development (FCS724)

Full-year Course

This course is designed as a basis for further study at the college level, and will explore the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of the child from the moment of conception through age 6. Students will study how historical and sociological influences affect our concepts of raising children. Theories of development as expressed by psychologists such as Piaget and Erikson will be introduced through a variety of learning experiences. The student should be able to make informed decisions about parenthood/guardianship as well as being prepared to care for a child or children. Child Development is especially relevant for students interested in careers in teaching, social services, day care, nursery school, the health and medical professions and any other profession dealing with children.

     International Games (PE8460)

Semester Course

The focus of this course will be placed on activities that have been developed in various  countries. These games are embedded into the country's culture, therefore, are played with a high rate of participation. This course strives to increase students’ awareness and knowledge regarding these activities.  In addition the focus will be on game play, strategy, rules and sportsmanship. Some of the activities are Rugby, Golf, Lacrosse, Cricket, Korfball, Volleyball, Indoor Fistball, and/or Field Hockey.

     Lifeguard Training (PE9045)

Prerequisite: Must be able to swim 300 yards, and be at least 15 years old. Other requirements are available in the

physical education department

Semester Course

The primary purpose of the Lifeguarding program is to provide entry level lifeguard

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participants with the knowledge and skills to prevent, recognize and respond to emergencies and to provide care for injuries and sudden illnesses until emergency medical services (EMS) personnel arrive. After successful completion of this course, students will receive two American Red Cross Certificates (1) Lifeguarding/First Aid certificate which is valid for 3 years and (1) CPR/AED for the professional rescuer which is valid for 2 years. This course is available during Semester 1.

     Net Games (PE8400)

Semester course

This course is designed for the student who enjoys many different Net Games. The focus will be on hand/eye coordination developing skill level and sportsmanship. Activities to be included are: badminton, volleyball, tennis, pickle ball and table tennis.

     Physical Fitness Training (PE8050)

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Strength Training and Conditioning or Advanced Weight Training

Semester Course

This class offers both traditional and nontraditional training methods.  It is designed with the many types of workouts that are popular today and may appeal to the many different needs for students looking for specialty training.  Although the 5 fitness components will be covered, the activities will touch on them in a non-traditional way.  The types of workouts will include, weight training, plyometric training, pilates, yoga, crossfit, and many more. This course is available during Semester 2.

     Physical/Health Education Grade: Focus on At-Risk Behaviors (PE9060)

Prerequisite: Must be recommended by school adjustment counselor or guidance counselor and meet required specific

criteria

Semester Course

This semester-long course is targeted to students who exhibit risk factors such as poor school achievement, potential for school dropout, and other at-risk behaviors.  This class teaches skills to build resiliency with respect to risk factors and to moderate early signs of substance abuse, and depression/aggression.  The class is divided into the following five modules: (1) getting started, (2) self-esteem enhancement, (3) decision making, (4) personal control, and (5) interpersonal communication.

     Strength Training & Conditioning (PE8000)

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Semester Course

Drawing on the latest scientific principles and theories related to resistance training, this course provides the “how” and the “why” behind the proper performance of popular upper-body, lower-body and trunk exercises. By understanding the purpose and correct form for each exercise, students will be able to gain the full benefit of each exercise that provides and avoids injury. Students will learn the latest information related to resistance training program design, training systems, periodization principles and a continuum of training programs. During strength training and conditioning each student will be responsible for researching, designing and implementing a plan of fitness specific to their individual needs and goals. Students will be expected to complete daily journals, pre/post evaluations, and actively participate in daily workouts. This course is available during Semester 1.

     Advanced Level Weight Training (PE8100)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Strength Training and Conditioning

Semester Course

This physical education elective course is designed to further establish a student's knowledge of weight training principles, concepts, form, techniques, and theories. Students will learn and practice safe, appropriate form and technique for all equipment in the weight room. This course will provide the students with opportunities to expand their understanding of weight training, while offering plenty of opportunities to practice skills. Students will research and implement a weight training program designed for their needs and goals. There will be a strong emphasis on the “how” and the “why” behind proper performance of upper-body, lower-body, and trunk exercises, while increasing strength, flexibility, and range of motion. Students will be expected to establish weight training goals and to meet them throughout the course. Students will research current weight training principles, concepts, and theories as well as apply new and previous knowledge to enhance their program goals. Students will be expected to actively participate in the daily work-outs they designed. Students will also be expected to present their progress to the class during this course. This course is available during Semester 2.

     Team Games (PE8300)

Semester Course

This course is designed for the student who enjoys team sports. The activities will be played at a moderate to high level of skill and intensity. The focus will be on: team play, strategy, and sportsmanship. Some of the activities included are: ultimate frisbee, team handball, floor hockey, flag football, soccer, volleyball basketball and water polo. This course is available during Semester 1.

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     Advanced Team Games (PE8301)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Team Games

Semester Course

This course is designed for the student who enjoys team sports and is interested in achieving proficiency in various team sport skills and knowledge. This course will provide students with opportunities to participate competitively with their peers in a variety of team sports as they apply higher level offensive and defensive concepts and strategies. This course will expand upon the Team Games (PE8300) course by introducing students to other roles, responsibilities, and components of team sports including coaching, score-keeping, statistical documentation, practice planning/execution, and tournament scheduling and participation. The goal of this course is to not only provide students with maximum participation in team sports, but to achieve competency in all aspects. This course is available during Semester 2.

SKILLS PROGAMS

Career and Technical Education Center Programs

First year courses are open to sophomore and juniors students. Freshmen considering career exploration are advised to select an introductory or basic course in the area of their choosing. There is a three year mandatory program requirement for Health Assistant, Cosmetology, Machining and Early Childhood Care.

The Career And Technical Education Center (Career TEC) is an extension of the seven member high schools served by the Lower Pioneer Valley Educational Collaborative. Transportation to and from Career TEC is provided by the Lower Pioneer Valley Educational Collaborative. Enrolling at Career TEC is a part of the process of course selection in the home high school. Career TEC programs are recognized career pathways, as defined by the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Act of 1990 and 1998, and as such these students are eligible to register for Tech Prep.

Students who are interested in applying to CTEC are encouraged to request a CTEC program of study from their guidance counselor. Students who are accepted into CTEC must complete all local and state graduation requirements.

Students who are enrolled in CTEC will be assigned in the morning session or afternoon session depending on their year in high school. All Freshmen and Juniors are assigned to CTEC to the morning session while the Sophomores and

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Seniors are assigned to the afternoon session. There are no exceptions.

The current areas of study awards academic equivalencies for the following subjects:

Area

English

Math

Science

PE/Health

Automotive

 

5 Credits

5 Credits

 

Carpentry

 

5 Credits

5 Credits

 

Cosmetology

 

2.5 Credits

2.5 Credits

 

Culinary

 

2.5 Credits

 

5 Credits

Design VC

5 Credits

 

5 Credits

 

Early Childhood Care

       

Facilities Management

 

2.5 Credits

5 Credits

 

Fashion Technology

 

2.5 Credits

   

Graphic Communication

 

5 Credits

5 Credits

 

Health Assistant

 

5 Credits

5 Credits

5 Credits

Horticulture & Landscape

 

5 Credits

5 Credits

 

Information Support & Network

 

5 Credits

5 Credits

 

Machining

       

Integrated Work Based Learning

Common Prerequisites To All Work Experience Opportunities:

Students must provide their own transportation to and from offsite program.

Students are encouraged to find their own work experience job or non-paid internship that is covered under Workers’ Compensation. Assistance in finding a job or internship will be provided upon request.

Credit for work experience will be awarded based upon successful completion of all course requirements.

     Work-Based Learning (WBL861-WBL862)

Full-year Course

This program is available to students in grades 11 & 12.

WBL860 = Two periods per day dismissal from school for approved work activities. The student shall follow and successfully complete the planned program of study to earn ten credits for this option.

WBL861 = One period per day dismissal from school for approved work activities. The student shall follow and successfully complete the planned program of study to earn five credits for this option.

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The goal of this program is to provide the student with an experience that connects the academic world with the world of work. Under the mentorship of the employer, the student will be evaluated in competencies related to the world of work. These competencies are also related to success in a school environment. The evaluation instrument utilized is the Massachusetts Work –Based Learning Plan. Goals are established for each student. Students are required to work in a verifiable, approved work site for a minimum average of 15 hours per week. These hours must be worked primarily during the school week. Students must receive verifiable wages. Students are also required to complete career related assignments each term. These activities utilize both academic and career development standards and are the foundation for the career planning process. Students utilize a variety of print and electronic sources in this process. Midterm and final projects/exams are required.

Career Work-Based Learning

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Work-Based Learning

Grade 11 and grade 12 students only

CBL865 = Three periods per day dismissal from school for approved work activities. The student shall follow and successfully complete the planned program of study to earn ten credits for this option.

CBL866 = Two periods per day dismissal from school for approved work activities. The student shall follow and successfully complete the planned program of study to earn ten credits for this option.

CBL867 = One period per day dismissal from school for approved work activities. The student shall follow and successfully complete the planned program of study to earn five credits for this option.

The goal of this program is to expand upon the skills developed in the Work-Based Learning Program. Students participating in this program will be employed in a career-related area that was identified in year one. The student will also be evaluated utilizing the Massachusetts Work-Based Learning Plan, with additional competencies being evaluated. Student must receive verifiable wages. The CBLP student is required to complete assignments related to their work experience and career development. Midterm and final projects/exams are required.

Internship/Related Work-Experience (Non-Paid) Onsite & Offsite

Career Internship - One period per day dismissal from school for approved non-paid offsite internship. This specialized program is only open to seniors and related  

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to career choice. Prerequisite: Meeting with Career Facilitator and signed contract prior to start.

Total hours of internship = 150 (2.5 credits)

Semester Course

Career internships are specialized off site training opportunities in which individual students are paired with a mentor in a field that is related to their career choice. The student will participate in daily activities related to this career field. Evaluation will be based upon the student’s performance and career-related assignments, including a final assignment. Foundation and specific site related skills will be evaluated twice per semester utilizing the Massachusetts Work-Based Learning Plan.

Career Internship - Two periods per day dismissal from school for approved non-paid offsite internship. This specialized program is only open to seniors and related to career choice. Prerequisite: Meeting with Career Facilitator and signed contract prior to start.

Total hours of internship = 150 (5 credits)

Semester Course

Onsite Teacher/School Assistant – One period per day spent in an assistant capacity. May or may not be career related. This course is only available to Juniors and Seniors. Examples include, but are not limited to, office assistant, teacher assistant, library assistant and special projects assistant. Students will be evaluated using the Work-Based Learning Plan

Semester-based, but may extend over the course of a full year 2.5 or 5 credits

The onsite assistant program provides the student with the opportunity to acquire and develop foundation skills as well as site specific skills. The student may or may not be in a work capacity related to their career choice. Evaluation will be based upon the student’s performance and career-related assignments, including a final assignment. Foundation and specific site related skills will be evaluated twice per semester utilizing the Massachusetts Work-Based Learning Plan.

Onsite Internship - One period per day spent in an assistant capacity. May or may not be career related. This course is only available to Juniors and Seniors. Examples include, but are not limited to, office assistant, teacher assistant, library assistant and special projects assistant. Students will be evaluated using the Work-Based Learning Plan.

Semester-based, but may extend over the course of a full year 2.5 or 5 credit. Is offered as a PASS/FAIL course.

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The onsite assistant program provides the student with the opportunity to acquire and develop foundation skills as well as site specific skills. The onsite faculty member serves as a mentor to the student and is responsible for providing meaningful experiences on a daily basis, as well as evaluating the student twice during the semester. The student in turn is responsible for displaying foundation skills and in developing work specific skills under the guidance of their mentor. Evaluation by the onsite faculty member will be based upon the student’s performance and required career-related assignments, including a final assignment. Students will be scheduled for this course to a specific department. The department chair will assume responsibility for the students training, placement, and assignments.

Students must apply to this class during the scheduling process. Failure to provide the completed application by May 1st to their guidance counselor will eliminate the student from consideration in placement and they will be enrolled in a class that is their alternate choice. Applications will not be accepted after scheduling unless a need is recognized.

SPECIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS

The Special Services Programs are designed to provide an appropriate course of studies for students with special needs who require specially designed instruction. To be eligible to attend Special Services classes, a student must be referred for an evaluation in accordance with Chapter 28 Regulations. Such determination or referral must be based upon a finding that a child, because of disability consisting of an intellectual, sensory, neurological, emotional communication, physical, specific learning or health impairment or combination thereof, is unable to progress effectively in regular education and requires special education services. When students are found eligible for special education, the appropriate accommodations will be made in their regular classes and/or the student will be assigned to the appropriate class or classes where the specified modifications will be implemented.

Resource Room Programs:

All Grades: (Full-Year Or Semester Courses)

English Courses

     English (ENG918)(9), (ENG919)(10), (ENG920)(11), (ENG921)(12)

Full year Course

See English core course description for course details for Grades 9 (ENG015/THS015), 10 (ENG025), & 11 (ENG030). As there is no equivalent course for English 12 (ENG921) this course will embrace the 12th grade Common Core Standards. Students

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will continue on their journey of expanding and polishing reading, writing, research, technology, listening, viewing, and speaking skills while studying a variety of genres. Active reading strategies, and higher order/critical thinking skills will be utilized to analyze and interpret reading selections. Lastly, many types of writing will be practiced using all steps of the writing process, this includes analytical essays and a research essay

     Integrated English/Reading (ENG970)(9) (ENG971)(10) (ENG972)(11) (ENG973)(12)

Prerequisite: Team or Teacher Recommendation

Full-year Course

Read 180 is an intensive reading intervention program designed to meet the needs of students who are reading below grade level. The program directly addresses individual needs through adaptive instructional software, high-interest fiction and nonfiction, and direct instruction in reading and writing skills. As a systematic reading intervention program, it incorporates six elements: a scientific research base, proven results, comprehensive instruction, purposeful assessment, data-driven instruction, and professional development. The Read 180 software continually adjusts the level of instruction based on student performance. Reports and periodic checkpoints alert teachers to students’ needs and direct them to resources for individualizing instruction.

     Literacy Instruction (OSS932)

Full-year Course

This course provides instructional strategies on literacy skills to improve sight word development, fluency, spelling, phonemic awareness, comprehension, critical thinking, and/or expressive language skills. The learning format for this class includes, but is not limited to:

small group instruction

monitoring and reinforcement

evaluation of strategies and skills

Mathematics Courses

     Algebra IA (MAT914)

Full-year Course

See course description for Algebra IA (MAT205/THS210)

     Algebra IB (MAT915)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of a common core Pre-Algebra course or

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Algebra 1A or its equivalent

Full-year course

See course description for Algebra IB (MAT215/THS215/Honors THS216)

     Geometry (MAT930)

Prerequisite: Successful completion or concurrently enrolled in Algebra I

Full-year Course

See course description for Geometry (MAT233)

Science Courses

     Biology (SCI 929)

Full-year Course

See course description for Biology II (SCI312/THS312)

     Biology II (SCI 930)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology

Full-year Course

See course description for Biology II (SCI313)

     Learning Center - LCT (OSS934)

Full-year Course

This course provides organizational and study strategies to help students with disabilities who attend regular education classes. Collaboration between student, regular education teachers and the learning center teacher is an integral part of this course. The learning format includes, but is not limited to:

1:1 instruction

small group instruction

monitoring and reinforcement

homework strategies

evaluation of strategies and skills

academic test monitoring

     Food Service Lab (FCS936)

Full-year Course

This course provides training in the practical application of all areas of Food Service including menu planning, food preparation, serving meals, cleaning, the collection of

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money, and making change. An introduction to good preparation and nutrition is tied in with an intensive introduction to good work habits.

     Food Lab Maintenance (FCS940)

Full-year Course

This course is an introduction to the support services required to maintain an operational food service. Equipment cleaning, maintenance, and basic organizational skills are emphasized.

     Vocational Skills Lab (FCS957)

Full-year Course

This course provides students with the opportunity to explore and research career interests that are suited to their skill levels. Students will work in the 411 Disability workbook to learn self-awareness and self-advocacy skills that they can transfer to the workforce. Depending on the needs of the students enrolled in the course, topics covered can include but are not limited to clerical duties, library work, working with a job coach, transportation and working within the community. Students will also work on social skills, communication skills and time management throughout the course of study.

Developmental Life Skills Program I

The Developmental Life Skills Program I has been created to allow student involvement and interaction within their community setting using an interdependence model. Consistent with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, this program will increase student knowledge of basic academic skills as well as activities of daily living.

This process will be achieved by completing the following components:

Instruction of classroom curriculum will be based on monthly themes involving common community locations.

Life lessons will include proper location, function, usage, and social interaction within each environment. Academic lessons will include appropriate reading, math, science, and social studies relating to both the life lessons and the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

To enhance student’s understanding of each setting, field trips are planned monthly according to each theme.

The Developmental Life Skills Program I course offerings are as follows:

     Activities of Daily Living (FCS963)

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Full-year Course

This course develops student’s abilities in areas of everyday living. These activities include cooking skills, cleaning skills, following directions, letter writing, laundry skills, shopping skills, proper hygiene, and identifying proper emergency services.

     Adaptive Physical Education (PED968)

Full-year Course

This course prepares the students for lifelong physical fitness through a variation of activities such as swimming, walking, weight lifting, and a variety of sports.

     Instrumental Music (MUS900)

Semester Course

Through music and working with different instruments, including the piano, bells and all types of percussion instruments, music will help students with physical skills, concentration, language, and reading. One on one and in small group instruction students will work on specific goals whether it is fine motor skills, or increasing attention span with the use of music to motivate.

     Mathematics (MAT966)

Full-year Course

This course will familiarize students with functional math skills. This includes number recognition, sorting by physical attributes, creating patterns, appropriate money skills, telling time, measuring tools and accuracy, and calendar skills.

     Reading (ENG962)

Full-year Course

This course includes developing basic reading and communication abilities. This is accomplished by using specific reading materials, building comprehension skills, identifying specific sight words and symbols, sequencing short stories, identifying story structure, developing the use of American Sign Language, and developing vocabulary meaning and usage.

     Sensory Awareness (FCS967)

Full-year Course

This course focuses on increasing student sensory and fine motor skills by producing creative art projects. These projects may coincide with holidays, special occasions, field trip activities, or the general curriculum. Some activities may include cutting, gluing,

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molding, coloring, touch, smell, listening, and tasting.

     Social Studies (SST965)

Full-year Course

This course involves developing the student’s understanding of living in West Springfield. It focuses on location identification, specific address learning, math usage, local government, community services, scheduling, and current events.

Developmental Life Skills Program II

The Developmental Life Skills Program II has been created at West Springfield High School to provide students with a community based program to assist them in developing their vocational and independent living skills in a manner consistent with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. In partnership with community-based vocational service agencies, the program includes field trips to local businesses and community resources to build student skills in the community in anticipation of future employment and independent living. The program has the following components:

Classroom lessons are organized around a common theme from the Curriculum Frameworks relating to the community destination.

Lessons include understanding of the nature and function of the business or organization, necessary vocabulary, social skills, math skills, personal safety strategies, and job opportunities available at the field trip site.

Students will be encouraged to explore career interests, expand community knowledge, and develop relationships with key persons at the business or agency.

An important goal of the program is to involve parents/guardians in their child’s educational process as much as possible. The Developmental Life Skills Teaching Team recognizes that parents/guardians know their child’s interests and aspirations best, and encourages parents/guardians to offer suggestions to improve the parents/guardians and school partnership.

The Developmental Life Skills Program course offerings are as follows:

Students who are eligible to receive special services until 22 years of age will have an

individualized transition plan developed at their Team Meeting

     Community Based Social Studies (SST906)

Full-year Course

This course involves learning real life skills including, but not limited to, citizenship, family and community living, reading and using the newspaper for independent

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functioning. Civics, geography, and history will be taught as it pertains to living in West Springfield.

     Developmental English (ENG935)(9), (ENG941)(10), (ENG942)(11), (ENG945)(12)

Full-year Course

This course concentrates on developing the ability to read and improve basic reading skills. Skills covered are observing, classifying, visual patterning, sequencing, predicting outcomes, deductive reasoning, drawing conclusions, problem solving to understand story order, recognizing letters, consonant and vowel sounds, word families, and vocabulary development.

     Field Trip/Community Exposure (FCS956)

Full-year Course

Students will participate in a weekly field trip to reinforce classroom learning. Students will tour various work sites that could be appropriate placements for future employment. Trips will include a visit to the site, and discussion of each site before, during and after each visit. Field trips will allow students to explore job opportunities, develop relationships with local employers, and widen their experiential awareness of community services and activities.

     Functional Science (SCI961)

Full-year Course

This course focuses on the Science/Technology and Engineering curriculum frameworks. Students will study functional life skills such as the weather or parts of the body. Students will connect how they are related to everyday life experiences such as self-care and nutrition. Students prepare work samples that are assembled into a portfolio so they can personally document their achievements in this class.

     Home Maintenance and Daily Living Skills (FCS914)

Full-year Course

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of using tools and products necessary to maintain a household. Students will learn skills in household cleaning and maintenance including the safe operation of appliances and household equipment. Skills such as the safe use and storage of household cleaning supplies, laundry procedures, general household sanitation and safety will be covered. Students will also learn skills in the care of clothing and making small or individual meals within a home environment.

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Shopping strategies and budgeting for food, clothing and household goods will also be implemented throughout the year.

     Instrumental Music (MUS900)

Semester Course

Through music and working with different instruments, including the piano, bells and all types of percussion instruments, music will help students with physical skills, concentration, language, and reading. One on one and in small group instruction students will work on specific goals whether it is fine motor skills, or increasing attention span with the use of music to motivate.

     Life Skills Math (MAT910)

Full-year Course

This course includes an extensive review of basic math skills from number recognition, sequencing, sorting by size, shape, and color, to money skills (coin recognition, making change, hourly wages), telling time, measuring, and calendar skills (day, month, year).

     On the Job Training (OJT951-all day), (OJT952-half-day)

Full-year Course

Part-time or full-time job placement will be available to each student as parents/guardians, and school staff determine student readiness and appropriate placement. Coordination and coaching will be provided by a community-based vocational services agency.

     Personal Health, Safety, and Hygiene (FCS953)

Full-year Course

This course provides instruction in basic personal hygiene, first aid, body parts and function, environmental safety, medication dosage, nutrition, personal and family relationships, personal safety, and community health issues.

     Physical Education/Adaptive Physical Education (PED968)

Full-year Course

Students will participate in gym class activities with the regular student population with assistance from an adaptive physical education teacher. Emphasis is on lifelong exercise and recreation activities appropriate and interesting for each student.

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Alternative High School

Alternative High School. Prerequisite; Special Education with Social/Emotional and/or Behavioral Disability. Placement at the Alternative High School is a result of a Special Education Team Meeting. The school incorporates both challenging academics and highly specialized therapeutic components. All matriculating students have an Individual Education Plan and are offered the opportunity to receive small group and individual assistance as needed. The program emphasizes grade level academics, intensive incentive based behavioral management programming, social skills programming, counseling and a small predictable structured setting for the student with a social/emotional and/or behavioral disability who is temporarily unable to cope or adjust to the traditional educational setting. Students complete graduation requirements through course availability and an individualized scheduling process.

English

     AS English 9 (ALT100)

Full-year Course

See course description for English 9 (ENG/015/THS015)

     AS English 10 (ALT101)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 9

Full-year Course

See course description for English 10 (ENG025)

     AS English 11 (ALT102)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 10

Full-year Course

See course description for English 11 (ENG030)

     AS English 12 (ALT103)

Full-year Course

As there is no equivalent course for English 12 (ALT103) this course will embrace the 12th grade Common Core Standards. Students will continue on their journey of expanding and polishing reading, writing, research, technology, listening, viewing, and speaking skills while studying a variety of genres. Active reading strategies, and higher order/critical thinking skills will be utilized to analyze and interpret reading selections.Lastly, many types of writing will be practiced using all steps of the writing process, this includes analytical essays and a research essay

     AS Creative Arts (ALT301)

Full-year Course

This course offers the student an overview of various art forms including; graphic arts

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and drawing, introduction to art history and paintings, introduction to music theory and history, introduction to photography and introduction to theater and film.

Social Studies

     AS U.S. History (ALT200)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of AS Modern World History

Full-year Course

See course description for US History IA (SST183) & US History IB (SST184)

     AS U.S. History II (ALT207)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of AS U.S. History

Full-year Course

See course description for US History IIA (SST193) & US History IIB (SST194)

     AS Modern World History (ALT202)

Full-year Course

See course description for Modern World History (SST170/THS170)

Mathematics

     AS Algebra I (ALT601)

Full-year Course

See course description for Algebra IA (MAT205/THS210) & Algebra IB (MAT215/THS215)

     AS Algebra II (ALT602)

Prerequisite: Algebra I and AS Geometry

Full-year Course

See course description for Algebra II (MAT223)

     AS Geometry (ALT603)

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Full-year Course

See course description for Geometry (MAT233)

     AS Business Math (ALT600)

Full-year Course

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See course description for Business Math (MAT212)

     AS MCAS Math (ALT605)

Full-year Course

See course description forMCAS Math (MAT270 & MAT 271)

Computer and Business

     AS Introduction to Computers (ALT800)

Semester Course

This course focuses on alphabetical keyboard learning, technique development, keyboarding fluency and speed. Students will also learn the word processor, spreadsheet applications and power point presentation tools. Students will learn introductory skills in creating word documents.

     AS Computer Skills (ALT801)

Semester Course

This course is a continuation of AS Introduction to Computers. Students will continue to utilize power point tools and will create a power point presentation. Students will also be exposed to Microsoft Office applications such as; Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft Power Point.

Science

     AS Biology (ALT500)

Full-year Course

See course description for Biology (SCI312/THS312)

     AS Biomedical Science (ALT330)

Full-year Course

See course description for Biomedical Science (SCI330)

     AS Earth Science (ALT502)

Full-year Course

See course description for Earth Science (SCI321)

Fine and Applied Arts

     AS Art (ALT803)

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Full-year Course

This curriculum concentrates on understanding and utilizing the elements of art and the principals of design. Students will be introduced to various media and techniques and will gradually gain comfort with, and competence in, their usage of tools of self-expression.

     AS Art II (ALT804)

Prerequisites: Successful Completion of AS Alt Art (ALT803)

Full year Course

The techniques and media offered in Art are practiced more intensively.

Physical Education/Health Education

     AS Physical Education 9 (ALT900)

Semester Course

Emphasis will be placed on fitness and appropriate social interactions including: cooperation, teamwork, sportsmanship, and civility through a variety of individual and team activities.

     AS Physical Education 10 (ALT901)

Prerequisites: AS Phys Ed 9 (ALT900)

Semester Course

Emphasis will continue to be placed on fitness and appropriate social interactions including: cooperation, teamwork, sportsmanship, and civility through a variety of individual and team activities.

     AS Physical Education 11(ALT902)

Prerequisites: AS Phys Ed 9 (ALT900), AS Phys Ed 10 ALT901)

Semester Course

Emphasis will continue to be placed on fitness and appropriate social interactions including: cooperation, teamwork, sportsmanship, and civility through a variety of individual and team activities.

     AS Physical Education 12 (ALT903)

Prerequisites: AS Phys Ed 9 (ALT900), AS Phys. Ed. 10 (ALT901), AS Phys Ed. 11(ALT902)

Semester Course

Emphasis will continue to be placed on fitness and appropriate social interactions including: cooperation, teamwork, sportsmanship, and civility through a variety of team and individual activities.

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     AS Health (ALT905)

Semester Course

Topics will include: Components of health, stress management, eating disorders, STDs, environmental hazards, self-esteem, reproductive health, teen pregnancy, fetal development, self respect, decision making, reproduction and sleep deprivation.

Family and Consumer Sciences

     AS Family Living (ALT723)

Semester Course

This course is designed to help the student to understand him/her and relationships with others. Some of the areas to be studied and discussed are personality development, attitudes, values and goals, marriage and commitment, communication, stress and family crises, responsible parenting, alternative life styles, and the changing roles of today’s family members.

Additional Support/Life Skills Courses

All Grades: (Full-Year Or Semester Courses)

     Learning Center (ALT934)

Full-year Course

This course provides organizational and study strategies to assist students in the Alternative School. In addition this course provides students with the opportunity to receive re-teaching of previously learned skills and a study period to work on homework and projects. Organizational components include; graphic organizers for literacy, organization of materials and strategies for self-organization.

     Vocational Skills Lab (ALT700)

Full-year Course

This course provides training in the practical application of vocational skills within the high school setting or within the community. Topics covered can include but are not limited to computer/keyboarding skills, landscaping, culinary skills, janitorial skills, painting, introductory manufacturing/construction technology, library skills, personal financial management, and general career exploration.